Historical Thrillers

Yesternight by Cat Winters

The Search for Transformation 

yesternight_coverBy Alison McMahan

What does mention of the year 1918 mean to you?

To Cat Winters, it means the Spanish Influenza, the devastation that was WW I, and the new social spaces that developed for women as a result.

These concerns, leavened with a healthy but skeptical interest in Spiritualism, color all her books to date, starting with In the Shadow of Blackbirds, a supernatural mystery for young adults that featured all of the above.

“I always wanted to write historical fiction. When I started my journey toward publication, I’d written one that I was shopping around. It was set in the 1890s and I was madly in love with it. I submitted it to agents, rewrote it, got rejected. Finally I signed with one agent who sent it out, but historical fiction was a tough sell at the time.”

Winters parted ways with her first agent and tried her hand at contemporary fiction, a suburban satire for adults about a woman married to a vampire. This book led her to Barbara Poelle, the agent she has now. “The plot was a commercial idea, but no one knew what to do with that book. It crossed several genres. It pitched like chicklit but I’d written it in this literary voice. A lot of editors gave me feedback, I rewrote following their notes, but none of them bought it and I ended up hating the book.”

But one of those editors said the only paranormal she was taking was historical paranormal. Winters pitched a book she has already started about WW I, the Spanish influenza, and spiritualism, a book for adolescents. That became In the Shadow of Blackbirds, the first of a series of similarly themed books for young adults (she’s just handed in the manuscript for her fourth, Odd and True).

After she’d written two of the young adult books, an editor from Harper Collins picked up In the Shadow of Blackbirds, read it on the plane, then contacted her agent and asked for an adult book. “That became The Uninvited – the book I was invited to write. And that’s how I started publishing adult fiction. It sounds like an overnight success story, but in reality, it took me two decades to break in.”

Winter’s adult books have their own flavor, different from young adult, which have more of a horror bent (Blackbirds was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award). “My YA books are more traditional horror, my adult books are more psychological horror.”

The Uninvited has now been followed by YESTERNIGHT. Both of her adult books have a few elements in common: “They really focus on people who don’t have the best past. They are trying to reconcile with their past and make new futures for themselves” at a time of great historical turbulence.
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Festival of Fear by Ron Parham

FESTIVALFrontCover_4-22-16SmBy Ron Parham

FESTIVAL OF FEAR is my third novel in the Paxton Brothers Saga, a series about an ordinary American family who find themselves caught up in extraordinary circumstances. FESTIVAL OF FEAR is actually a prequel to the first two novels in the series, a story about the Paxton brothers as kids growing up in rural Iowa in the early sixties. It’s unusual in that the protagonist in the first two novels, Molly’s Moon and Copperhead Cove, is only three years old in FESTIVAL OF FEAR. Thus, the reader of the first two novels starring Ethan Paxton will get to witness what his childhood was like. Confused? Let me explain further.

Molly’s Moon, my first published novel released in 2014, takes place during 9/11, in 2001. It follows Ethan Paxton as a businessman in his early forties that was stuck in Europe when the World Trade Center buildings came down. With America’s airports closed for days, he had to find a way to get into Mexico where his teenage daughter had been kidnapped by sex traffickers.It’s a fast-paced thriller with multiple points-of-view, including that of the kidnapper and the kidnapped daughter. My second novel, published in 2015, was Copperhead Cove, which takes place in 2003, two years after Molly’s Moon. Ethan Paxton is now in his mid-forties, helping his older brother, Bo, through a nightmare involving the Chicago mob, dead college basketball coaches, deadly snakes and all sorts of redneck characters.

Got it yet? Here’s where it gets a little weird, and hopefully interesting. My third novel, FESTIVAL OF FEAR, takes place in 1962, during the Cuban Missile crisis, when the fear and anxiety of the Cold War has the entire country on edge. Ethan Paxton, only three years old, is the youngest child of Clint and Eloise Paxton, who live in a small town in southwest Iowa. Ethan has two older brothers. Bo, who we met in Copperhead Cove, is seven, and oldest brother Nick, a new character to the series, is fifteen, a sophomore in high school and a football star. He is in love with a pretty blonde cheerleader who, unfortunately, is targeted as the next victim of a serial killer of young teenage girls that has been terrorizing the area. Nick is the protagonist, with his football coach, John Walters, playing a prominent role. Little Ethan and Bo are in the background, doing what small children do, even during a crisis. But their personalities are showcased so that the reader of the first two novels can relate to them. Like I said before, it’s a prequel to the first two novels.
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Whispers Beyond the Veil by Jessica Estevao

WhispersBeyond_FixBy Alison McMahan

Most of Jessica Estevao’s family, including her parents, were born and raised in Maine. Estevao has spent most of her life in New Hampshire, but a few years ago purchased a summer property in Old Orchard, Maine. And now her new historical paranormal mystery series, WHISPERS BEYOND THE VEIL, is set there.  “There’s so much history here. It really lends itself to storytelling.”

The mystery, Estevao’s fifth, starts out in Canada in 1898. Ruby Proulx travels the medicine-show circuit, making the snake-oil that her father hawks as a cure-all.  When one of her father’s miracle cures goes horribly wrong Ruby has to go on the run. “I wanted Ruby to feel quite desperate to have an anchored home,” she says. “Having her grow up in a medicine show seemed ideal for that.”

Her medicine show background also gives Ruby the skills of a con artist. She is clairaudient, that is, she receives psychic information through her hearing. Estevao had a couple of remarkable experiences of her own that made her interested in where intuition and warnings come from, which is what led her to give Ruby this particular gift.

“When I was a teenager, a new driver, I’d taken my younger sister to a middle school dance. My family home had double driveways, shaped like a lower-case ‘h.’ No one ever took the shorter branch of the driveway. But on my way home from this dance, I heard this voice in my ear telling me to take the second driveway. At first I thought it was weird and dismissed it. But when I got closer to the first driveway, I heard the voice again, louder this time, so I pulled into the first driveway.”

As soon as she did, there was an explosion on the street just ahead of her. A car slammed into a tree right in front of the entrance to the second driveway. Had Estevao followed her customary route, she and her little sister would have been in a serious accident. “There is stuff you can tap into,” says Estevao. “I don’t know how or why or where it comes from, but I appreciate it.”
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What Gold Buys: A Silver Rush Mystery by Ann Parker

what goldBy George Ebey

Author Ann Parker is back with WHAT GOLD BUYS, the latest in her Silver Rush mystery series.

The time is autumn of 1880. The place is the Rocky Mountains. The opening event, among frost and snow, is the return of Silver Queen Saloon owner Inez Stannert to Leadville, Colorado.

In this silver rush boomtown, those who are hungry for material riches seek their fortunes in precious metals, while others, hungry for spiritual relief, seek to pierce the veil between life and death with the help of fortunetellers, mediums, and occultists. When soothsayer Drina Gizzi is found murdered, strangled with a set of silver and gold corset laces, no one seems to care except the three who find her body—Inez, her lover Reverend Sands, and Drina’s young daughter, Antonia.

The mystery surrounding Drina’s death deepens when her body vanishes without a trace. As Inez and Antonia band together to seek out Drina’s killer, they unearth disturbing evidence of underground resurrectionists, long-held grievances, and unmitigated greed for what gold can and cannot buy. Delving into this dark underworld in search of answers might just buy Inez and Antonia a one-way ticket into unmarked grave.

The Big Thrill recently caught up with Parker to learn more about this epic historical series.

What first drew you to writing historical thrillers?

For me, place and era were the initial attraction. Although my mother and father were from Colorado and I had many relatives there, I had never heard of Leadville, Colorado, until an uncle mentioned that my paternal grandmother had been raised there. My uncle then went on enthusiastically and at some length about this mining town up at 10,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains. Leadville, he said, was home to a silver rush in 1879 that rivaled California’s gold rush in adventure, excitement, and stories, adding, “It was a real hell-raising place.” He finished with “Ann, I know you’ve been thinking of writing a novel. You should research Leadville and set a book there.”
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Eterna & Omega by Leanna Renee Hieber

Exploring New Worlds 

Eterna_finalcompBy Alison McMahan

When she was nine years old, Leanna Renee Hieber starred in Oliver! The Musical. From that moment on, she was determined to be an actress.

And a playwright.

And a novelist.

Not all of us see our dream clearly at age nine and then get to live it out, but Hieber did. She remained obsessed with Victorian London. “I’d always felt like I was a bit out of my time period, disconnected from the modern world. I was a kid in rural Ohio, and that feeling of being born in the wrong era was very painful. Then I heard of the concept of past lives. I knew I had a past life connection. I decided I was a reincarnate Victorian.”

Without a time machine, the best way to “back home” was through the theatrical world. Hieber majored in theater performance and minored in Victorian studies. She adapted Victorian works for the stage, from the poems of Rainer Maria Rilke to Alice in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll’s original novel, and incorporating Alice Liddell’s diaries). Writing and staging that play proved that she had a gift for the Victorian vernacular, and the kudos the work received bolstered her confidence to set her fiction in that time as well. “It’s important to de-romanticize the era. The Victorians had many problems. I’m attracted to all of it, not just the grandeur, but also the grit.”

In spite of a grueling performance schedule, she worked on her first novel. “I travelled around the regional theater circuit for ten years after college. There was no time to write, and yet I felt compelled to write. That’s when I first started working on The Strangely Beautiful Tale of Miss Percy Parker.” (A new, revised version of that book, now simply entitled Strangely Beautiful, has just been released by Tor.)

She moved to New York City in order to pursue her acting career. One day she was at a call-back audition for a role in a Broadway play, but found all she could think about was her book. “I decided if all I could think about at a Broadway call back was my novel, it was time to stop auditioning and focus on the book.”
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The Service of the Dead by Candace Robb

Service of the Dead KD2b REVBy George Ebey

The historical novel THE SERVICE OF THE DEAD introduces Kate Clifford, a young widow forged on the warring northern marches of 14th century England. Political unrest permeates York as Richard II and his cousin Henry Bolingbroke fight for the crown. Struggling to dig out from beneath the debt left by her late husband, Kate Clifford must solve a series of murders linked to her guesthouse, crimes that could split the kingdom and spell her ruin.

The Big Thrill recently checked in with Robb to learn more about her work and what the future holds.

What first drew you to writing stories involving historical suspense?

I fell down a rabbit hole.

In graduate school my interests led me away from British literature to medieval studies, a combination of literature and history and early languages, which was not officially sanctioned by my program. But I believed I could convince a PhD committee to allow an exception in my case. Not so. My department would not approve a mixed medieval lit/medieval history/medieval languages/popular culture (Tolkien) topic, and even when I dropped the latter part I was still stonewalled.

In the midst of this frustration I heard about a contest—what would you give Richard Wagner for his birthday? The prize for best idea was two tickets to the Ring Cycle in Seattle. I disliked Wagner, and saw the contest as an opportunity to indulge my grumpiness, so I entered with the snide comment that I would present him Anna Russell’s interpretation of his Ring Cycle to give him an idea of what twentieth century listeners thought of his work. If you have never heard Anna Russell’s hilarious sendoff of Wagner’s precious Ring of the Nibelungenlied, let me just say no one could have mistaken this for anything other than an insult. (And you should go online and find it. Really.)

Lo and behold, I won the contest. Down the rabbit hole. I flew out to Seattle, laughed hysterically through two of the four nights of the Ring, then forgot about it as I explored the area. Within a month, I gave up grad school with an ABD and moved to Seattle, where I entered the world of technical writing/editing. To pay the bills—Seattle is expensive. I loved my job—university campus, access to a good research library, working with people who loved what they did.
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The Secret Language of Stones by M.J. Rose

Building a Tangible, Unforgettable World

secret languageBy Dawn Ius

There’s something almost ethereal about M.J. Rose’s novels. From the whimsical cover art to the magical way the story unfolds onto the page, you always know what you’re in for—an experience that truly transports you into a past tale of intense suspense and romance.

THE SECRET LANGUAGE OF STONES, the second novel in Rose’s The Daughters of La Lune series, is no exception, once again taking readers to historic France, where we meet Opaline Duplessi, a watch-maker with a special gift—a form of lithomancy that allows her to translate the energy emanating from certain gemstones into “messages” from the grave. Her customers call it magic, but Opaline would rather believe she is merely a messenger, giving voice to the soldiers who have died in the first world war.

“I became fascinated with stones and rocks as a child,” Rose says. “And jewelry. For me they went hand in hand. Playing with my mother’s pearls, noticing their rainbow finish. Picking up rocks at the beach. A present from my parents—a white box with a dozen compartments and inside each was a different stone.”

But as with her story’s protagonist, Rose always understood that stones have a more important—even integral—role in our world that goes beyond the glitter and polish.

“I think stones are magic,” she says. “They can be ground down to make medicine or paint. They can be used to build shelter. Or used as tools to help us cook and prepare our food. They can be amulets and talisman’s. Things of beauty. Of value.  We walk on them. They are our very foundation. I think we are connected to them in a very complicated and profound way.”

In THE SECRET LANGUAGE OF STONES, Opaline learns this firsthand, when one of the fallen soldiers communicates a message meant specifically for her. It now becomes harder for her to deny not only her gift but also her growing feelings for this “ghost” of the past.
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The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper

royalnannyPBPublished steadily since 1982, New York Times-bestselling author Karen Harper writes both contemporary suspense and historical novels.  As the title of THE ROYAL NANNY suggests, her current release is a historical, but she never leaves her suspense roots.  This novel is what author Alex Halley dubbed “faction,” a blend of real events and people with fictional dialogue.    Domestic suspense is a growing subgenre today and this novel is that:  from the secrets and tragedies of Britain’s ruling Windsor family to the betrayal that led to the brutal deaths of the tsar’s family, to an attack by a World War One I Zeppelin, Harper blends the domestic and the deadly in THE ROYAL NANNY.

Can you tell us what THE ROYAL NANNY is about?

This historical novel is the true story of the Cockney lower class nanny, Charlotte Bill, who reared the children of King George V and Queen Mary, grandparents of the current queen.  Two of these six children are well known, the infamous King Edward VIII who gave up his throne and became the playboy and Nazi sympathizer, the Duke of Windsor; and King George VI, “Bertie” of The King’s Speech movie.  But the royals chose to hide their sixth child, Prince John, “the Lost Prince,” one of the many mysteries woven throughout the novel.

What sort of situation did “The Royal Nanny” have in the Windsor household?

Actually, she was an outsider who was an insider, caught between the servant class but constantly mingling with the upper class.  When I researched this book, it blew my mind that the Victorian and Edwardians let servants rear their children.  Because the royals traveled so much and because the parents of that day had a “hands off” approach to their children (the children were presented all cleaned up once a day, usually before tea time) the nannies literally reared the next rulers of the empire.

When Winston Churchill died, he had one photo on his bedside table, not that of his mother, wife or daughter but of his nanny, who was actually his “emotional mother.” Charlotte was that to her royal charges, despite dangers and deceptions.
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Fever City by Tim Baker

Fever City Europa World NoirBy Charlie Cochrane

Tim Baker is a debut novelist with a globe-trotting background and a CV to knock your socks off. I’m delighted to be the lucky girl who gets to interview him!

Tim, you’ve, quite literally, ”seen the world.” How did a globe-trotting Aussie boy end up in the south of France?

I left Australia to live in Rome when I was 23, and whilst there I heard about a friend of a friend who needed someone to look after a place in the centre of Madrid. Who can say no to a freebie like that? However, after a year, it became harder to renew my Spanish residency visa, and I needed to leave the country for three months.

So I headed up to Paris, not realizing what magic and possibility was awaiting me there. Writing gigs and a wonderful rent-controlled apartment quickly came my way. My philosophy has always been that the unexpected is something that’s meant to be: you just haven’t received the memo yet. Marriage, the birth of my son, and a “real job” at the Australian embassy followed. When we heard by chance about a place on the Riviera becoming available just as our son was finishing middle school, we said yes. Yes is always easier to say than maybe or later.

What inspired you to start writing FEVER CITY?

I stumbled across a sound archive of the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby and heard two things that shocked me. Were they proof of a conspiracy? Up until that moment, I had always believed that Oswald was the lone gunman, but if there was a conspiracy to kill Oswald, surely that suggested a conspiracy to kill JFK as well. I started doing research and was amazed that what I had heard in that recording had been missed by everyone else. I was on to something new. I started writing…
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Strangely Beautiful by Leanna Renee Hieber

StrangelyBeautiful-compBy Dawn Ius

Leanna Renee Hieber would never willingly tell you how hard the publishing industry is—though she’d have good reason. Like many authors, her road to success has been fraught with highs and lows: the struggle to find a publisher, the excitement in landing a deal, the despair when that deal went sour, and then the sheer determination to find another place for her work.

That effort paid off as STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL eventually sold in a three-book deal to Tor that not only restored Hieber’s faith in the industry—and herself—but also allowed her to go back to the story’s original vision. The result is a hauntingly beautiful romantic suspense for young adults that is peppered with well-placed horror and riveting gothic history.

Hieber often finds herself cheekily referring to the novel as “Victorian Ghostbusters” with action, adventure, mythology and an adorable love story—but that doesn’t quite do justice to the lyrical quality of Hieber’s stunning prose. If the novel’s journey to publication is not indication enough that this is the book of Hieber’s heart, the opening chapter alone provides convincing testimony.

In this interview with The Big Thrill, Hieber openly shares her journey to publication, the inspiration for STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL, and some sage advice for writers—or anyone, really—who has ever wanted to give up.

In STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL the reader is immediately brought into a world that is rich with description and atmosphere. I was blown away. What kind of setting research did you do for this book?

Emotionally and cognitively, I suppose it began with comprehending linguistic differences at an early age, distinguishing a varied vernacular between American and British English. I watched British television shows religiously (I’ve been a Doctor Who fan since Tom Baker, at the age of 7, so all of you who now think it’s cool, you’re behind the curve). I read Victorian novels in grade school and was entranced with anything “across the pond” as far back as I can remember. I grew up in rural Ohio with a soul far more familiar with old European cities.

My last year in college I was awarded a scholarship to travel to London for a senior project about Shakespearean theater spaces. Having always felt “called” to London, the moment I stepped onto its streets, I was home. I could feel the ghost stories. The air felt instantly familiar, like an old friend. Amidst walking tours focusing on ghosts and Jack the Ripper’s haunts, the beginnings of this book that would wholly change my life stirred my already overactive imagination to a fervor. I graduated from Miami University with a BFA in theater with a focus study in the Victorian Era. I can only describe my deep connection to the 19th century as being influenced by past lives.
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The Dark Lady’s Mask by Mary Sharratt

On the Trail of Shakespeare’s Hidden Partner

By Nancy Bilyeau

dark ladyMary Sharratt’s talent for creating richly imagined worlds of the past, in novels such as Vanishing Point, Daughters of the Witching Hill and Illuminations, has won her multiple literary awards. In her new book, she brings to life a little-known woman of Elizabethan England named Aemilia Bassano Lanier, who was the first professional woman poet. As the world celebrates Shakespeare on the 400th anniversary of his death, THE DARK LADY’S MASK takes readers on a suspenseful journey that asks: Was this woman his secret lover and collaborator?

What drew you to the story of Aemilia Bassano Lanier?

Aemilia Bassano Lanier (also spelled Lanyer) was the first professional woman writer in England. She was such a strong woman and her life was so filled with drama, suspense, tragedy, and triumph that she completely swept me away.

Born in 1569, she was the daughter of an Italian court musician—a man thought to have been a Marrano, a secret Jew living under the guise of a Christian convert. After her father’s death, Aemilia was fostered by Susan Bertie, a high-minded aristocrat who gave her the kind of humanist education generally reserved for boys in that era.

Later young Aemilia Bassano became the mistress of Henry Carey, Lord Chamberlain to Queen Elizabeth. As Carey’s paramour, she enjoyed a few years of glory in the royal court—an idyll that came to an abrupt and inglorious end when she found herself pregnant with Carey’s child. She was then shunted off into an unhappy arranged marriage with Alfonso Lanier, a court musician and scheming adventurer who wasted her money. So began her long decline into obscurity and genteel poverty, yet she triumphed to become a ground-breaking woman of letters.

In England at that time, the only literary genre considered acceptable for women to write was Protestant religious verse. Lanier turned this tradition on its head. Her epic poem, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (Hail God, King of the Jews), published in 1611, is nothing less than a vindication of the rights of women couched in religious verse. Dedicated and addressed exclusively to women, Salve Deus lays claim to women’s God-given call to rise up against male arrogance, just as the strong women in the Old Testament rose up against their oppressors.

What I’ve stated above are the documented facts about her life. The theory that she may also have been the mysterious Dark Lady of Shakespeare’s Sonnets only adds to her mystique.

My intention was to write a novel that married the playful comedy of Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard’s Shakespeare in Love to the unflinching feminism of Virginia Woolf’s meditations on Shakespeare’s sister in A Room of One’s Own. How many more obstacles would an educated and gifted Renaissance woman poet face compared with her ambitious male counterpart?
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A Death Along the River Fleet by Susanna Calkins

A 17th Century Sleuth Like No Other

death alongBy Alison McMahan

A DEATH ALONG THE RIVER FLEET is the fourth in the historical mystery series set in 17th century London by Susanna Calkins. The amateur sleuth is Lucy Campion, a chambermaid in the first book. In this fourth installment she works for a publisher, setting type, hawking tracts out on the street, and sometimes, penning a tract of her own.

And she solves murders.

Calkins, a former pirate (living history specialist), was inspired by a treasure trove of 17th century murder ballads, the penny press, and the kind of tracts that Lucy Campion sells. An oft-repeated tale in these sources featured a young woman, strangled or stabbed, found with a note—signed by her lover—tucked in her pocket. Her lover was rounded up, arrested, tried, and usually hanged for the crime. Calkins wondered, “Why would a young woman go to such a tryst, anyway? Why did the murderer sign the note? Why not remove the note after his victim was dead?”

Those questions are answered in the first novel in the series, A Murder at Rosamund’s Gate, set in London in 1665, right after London was hit by the Great Plague.

The second novel, From the Charred Remains, is set in 1666, right after the Great Fire. Early forensic science is used to find the killer.

The third, The Masque of a Murderer, is set in 1667. A man dying after what appears to be an accident reveals that he was murdered, and Lucy has to solve the crime. This novel was nominated for the Lefty, the Agatha, and the Mary Higgins Clark award.
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The Lord of Ireland by E.M. Powell

Writing Car Chases With Chain Mail


lord of irelandBy Dawn Ius

Put two readers of historical fiction in a room together and within seconds, the accuracy debate will begin. For writers of the genre, this can often lead to the daunting task of dodging ALL CAPS emails condemning everything from perceived inappropriate character depiction to the most minuscule detail—no matter how many sources the author has sourced to back it up.

For E.M. Powell, the author of three medieval thrillers, including THE LORD OF IRELAND, released this month, shouldering the weight of potential historical inaccuracy is just part of the genre—or perhaps, more accurately, part of being an author.

“You see it time after time: authors called out on a detail that’s not correct in legal thrillers, tech thrillers, medical thrillers, police procedurals. Or at least in the opinion of the commenter,” Powell says. “I have had thundering condemnation of things in my books for which I have at least three reputable sources. As for mistakes? Yes, despite my best efforts, I make them from time to time—as does every writer I know.”

Errors appear to be few and far between for Powell, though, as sales for her first medieval thrillers have launched her to a prime spot among her peers—book two in the series, The Fifth Knight became an Amazon UK #1 bestseller in Historical Fiction, and the series has sold more than 100,000 copies.

The key to her success, Powell says, begins with thorough research and ends with scenes that are rich with character—something she struggled with early in her career—and most important for readers of historical fiction, a strong sense of setting.

“Readers of historicals like quite a lot of setting, in much the same way fantasy and science fiction readers do,” she says. “It boils down to the fact that we’re trying to build an unfamiliar world and make it believable.”
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Hanging Mary by Susan Higginbotham

HangingMary-spectype_021615_SS4By Nancy Bilyeau

An award-winner for her historical fiction on such Plantagenet-era figures as Margaret of Anjou, Jane Dudley and Eleanor de Clare, Susan Higginbotham, an editor and attorney, turned her attention to the American Civil War for her suspense-driven sixth novel. HANGING MARY tells the story of Mary Surratt, a Southern-sympathizing widow who owned a boarding house in Washington, D.C., that became a meeting place for John Wilkes Booth and his co-conspirators. After Lincoln’s assassination, the question was, how much did Mary Surratt know? It was a question with fatal implications.

How long have you been interested in the story of Mary Surratt and what led to the decision to move your fiction from historical events in England to America?

I’ve been interested in the Lincoln assassination since I was a child, but I really didn’t know about Mary Surratt’s story until the film The Conspirator came out a few years ago. James Swanson’s book Manhunt intensified my interest, as did a couple of biographies of Mary–which reach entirely opposite conclusions about her guilt–and when it came time to propose my next book, Mary Surratt’s story was the one of several options that my editor lit upon. Since I grew up in the Washington, D.C., area, it was a treat to set my story in an area that was familiar to me.

How difficult was it to research the novel and where did you find the most useful documents?

Mary’s story wasn’t at all difficult to research–it was more a matter of sifting through all of the sources, which include trial transcripts, the evidence the government collected, memoirs, letters from Mary before she was widowed, and newspaper accounts. Nora Fitzpatrick, the young boarder who narrates half the novel, was a trickier matter, as I knew very little about her other than the bare genealogical facts when I started to do my research. Unfortunately for Nora, however, she spent the last ten years of her life at St. Elizabeth’s, the mental hospital in Washington, D.C., and I was able to get hold of her file, which includes a lengthy letter from her brother to the superintendent detailing her education and her ill-fated marriage. (Interestingly, he says not a word about Nora’s history as one of Mary Surratt’s boarders!) It, and a couple of comments he made about Nora’s personality, gave me a key to her character.
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The Midwife and the Assassin by Sam Thomas

An Unexpected Heroine From History

the midwifeBy Nancy Bilyeau

In his popular historical mystery series, Sam Thomas tells the story of Bridget Hodgson, a well-born widow in 17th century York. Specifically, the novels take place in the time of the English Civil War. Thomas discovered his protagonist while conducting research for his doctoral dissertation in York. In a will, he read the words: “I, Bridget Hodgson, of the City of York, midwife…” His depiction of her in the series is carefully drawn from historical research, though the murders she investigates are fictional. In an interview with The Big Thrill, he tells us more.

As an academic, you researched the lives of midwives in the early modern era. When did you have an “aha” moment and realize that a midwife would make an excellent protagonist for a historical mystery series?

Hmm, I’d never quite wondered that. Oddly enough, no! It’s because I came at the series from a somewhat different angle. I knew I wanted to write about midwives, but didn’t know what genre to choose? Straight historical? Historical thriller? Mystery? In the end, mystery seemed like a good idea, both from a practical and historical perspective.

First, in mysteries, you don’t have to worry as much about the plot, particularly where to start and end the story: You start with one dead body and you end with another dead body. (I don’t mean this as criticism: you could say the same thing about writing sonnets! You don’t have to wonder how many lines it will be, or what kind of meter you should use, but that doesn’t make Shakespeare a hack.)

Second, it turns out that midwives were key figures in law enforcement in England, investigating crimes ranging from bastardy and rape to infanticide and witchcraft. They also knew all the community’s secrets: what more could you want in the protagonist in a mystery series?
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Up Close: Interview with Steve Berry

Why You Should Write What You Love

14th colonyBy R.G. Belsky

There are authors who write thrillers set in the present-day, authors who write historical thrillers–and then there’s Steve Berry.

Berry once again mixes fascinating historical facts (the War of 1812, secret U.S. plans to invade Canada, the 20th Amendment for presidential succession and the Cold War) with fast-moving action in THE 14TH COLONY, his highly-anticipated new thriller about a desperate hunt to find hidden nuclear devices in Washington on the eve of the inauguration of a new President.

“We read that the cold war is returning, for some people it never went away,” Berry says about THE 14TH COLONY – the 11th book in his best-selling Cotton Malone series. “It deals with an ex-KGB agent who had a lot of regret and tries to extract a revenge. It deals with Canada, the only country to defeat us on the battlefield. And it deals with the 20th amendment. I wove that all into a ticking clock like a 48-hour adventure.”

Cotton Malone is an ex-Justice Dept. operative who runs a bookstore in Copenhagen and still finds himself plunged into dangerous international crises – but Berry describes his series hero as basically an “ordinary” guy.

“He was born in Copenhagen,” Berry said when asked how he came up with idea for the Cotton Malone character. “I was in Café Norden there and he just came in my brain: he’s going to live here, run a bookstore and stay in trouble. And I went home and wrote The Templar Legacy which was my breakout book.”

“I used my personality for him because I didn’t know more. He talks and acts like me – but I don’t shoot guns or any of those things he does. He makes mistakes, he screws up, and he has faults. He’s not a James Bond character – he’s a guy with ordinary problems, but he can do extraordinary things when called upon. I think that’s what people like: he could be your next door neighbor, but he has these abilities.”
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Speakers of the Dead by J. Aaron Sanders

speakersBy David Healey

Before he wrote Leaves of Grass or became a famous poet, and long before he had a rest stop named after him on the New Jersey Turnpike, Walt Whitman was a newspaper reporter eager for a good story.

In SPEAKERS OF THE DEAD, debut author J. Aaron Sanders has imagined Whitman as a young man caught up in a story of life—and death—as he reports on the sordid world of body snatching while trying to exonerate a friend accused of murder.

The year is 1843 and the setting is New York City. Sanders, a professor of literature, has done impeccable research into this time and place. Much of what he describes in the pages of SPEAKERS OF THE DEAD is unsettling from our 21st century viewpoint.

It scarcely seems believable that the women at the Women’s Medical College of Manhattan were discouraged from practicing medicine and barred from voting. Justice in New York was often delivered frontier-style, at the end of a rope. Corruption was the norm. Newspaper reporters not only wrote articles, but set them in lead type and printed the papers themselves on hand-powered printing presses, thus earning the nickname “ink-stained wretches.”

All of this historical context smoothly woven into the pages makes reading this novel fascinating. It’s also fun to read about Whitman during a time before he achieved literary fame.

“I like to look for gaps when I’m writing historical fiction,” Sanders said. “How did he become the Whitman of Leaves of Grass?”

The plot focuses on events surrounding the medical college, founded by a couple who are Whitman’s close friends. The husband is apparently murdered by the wife after he allegedly has an affair with a younger woman. The wife is hanged for the crime. Whitman sets out to clear both of their names.
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Starfall by John Hegenberger

Writing the “Near” History Mystery Thriller

starfallThe majority of what we call “historical mystery” takes place during or before WWII. It used to be that the term “antique” could only be applied to things over 100 years old. But now it frequently includes items from as recently as the 1960s. Blame it on the increasing pace of today’s electronic life, but there is now a growing interest in thrillers that take place less than 50 years ago, especially if they involve a fascinating setting, theme, or character.

The Stan Wade, L.A. private eye series, including my new novel, STARFALL, is an example of a Near History Mystery Thriller.

STARFALL is an adventure story of a Los Angeles private eye who gets hooked up with several well-known personalities of the time.

Stan’s office is in a cramped little room at the back of the Brown Derby restaurant, which lets him and the reader encounter several famous Hollywood stars and other notables of the day. The boat where he lives is moored out where they’re dredging what will one day be the glamorous Marina del Rey. And his biggest client is a movie producer, whose initials are W.D. and who is secretly connected to the FBI.

Stan is hired to figure out who murdered the 8th candidate for what today we know as the Mercury 7 astronauts.

You would think that in 1959 L.A., everything was calm and quaint on the outside, but underneath we all had fall-out shelters and knew the world could end it any moment.

Where did you get the idea for STARFALL?

I came to the idea by thinking about all the great television shows that originally aired when I was a kid. What would happen, I wondered, if the characters of these programs had to team up and deal with the real historical events of the time? In other words, what if someone like Mike Hammer were to visit 77 Sunset Strip in order to work with Sky King or Joe Friday to help stop the commies or organized crime in L.A.

What is the setting of this series of books?

Stan and his associates live in the Los Angeles of 1959. I fell in love with the year 1959. It seems to me that the majority of great private investigators worked out of Los Angeles at one era or another, and I want to put the reader in a setting that’s full of wonder and historical significance.

Historical fact or alternate history fiction?

Practically every celebrity in Los Angeles 1959 becomes part of the Stan Wade saga. Bobby Darin, Lloyd Bridges, John Ford, Mickey Cohen, Jack Benny, George Reeves, John Wayne, Ross MacDonald, Noel Coward, John Steinbeck, Philip K. Dick, and the Kingston Trio. As well as significant places like Pacific Ocean Park, Marineland, the Hollywood Playhouse, all gone… but not forgotten.

1959 was an important point in time when:

  • We still used the Univac to predict election outcomes.
  • The first color TV programs were broadcasted.
  • First use of those beeping hospital vital signs monitors.
  • Secret Soviet missile bases in Germany pointed at the UK.
  • Alaska and Hawaii become states.

At the back of each book in the series I’ve added “The Fact Behind the Fiction” which details the truth and gives deeper insight into the hidden underpinnings of our world today that began back in 1959.

What’s next for Stan Wade in 1959 L.A.?

The answer is another historical mystery thriller… and it’s a lot nearer than you’d think. Coming in April is a follow-up novel: SPADEFALL, where Stan searches for a lost Hammett novel (wherein the Op meets Sam Spade). The story propels our hard-luck L.A. PI first to Texas where he confronts Jack Ruby and then on to Hawaii where he risks life and livelihood to stop a Neo-Nippon threat to America’s new 50th state.



johnBorn and raised in the heart of the heartland, Columbus, Ohio, John Hegenberger is the author of several series: Stan Wade LAPI in 1959, Eliot Cross Columbus-based PI in 1988, and Ace Hart, western gambler from Wyoming to Arizona in 1877.  He’s the father of three, tennis enthusiast, collector of silent films and OTR, hiker, Francophile, B.A. Comparative Lit., Pop culture author, ex-Navy, ex-marketing exec at Exxon, AT&T, and IBM, happily married for 45 years and counting.  Active member of SFWA, PWA and ITW.

To learn more about John, please visit his website.


Spoils of Victory by John A. Connell

spoils victoryBy E.M. Powell

John A. Connell’s debut historical thriller, Ruins of War, introduced us to Mason Collins, a former Chicago homicide detective, U.S. soldier, and prisoner of war- turned-U.S. Army criminal investigator. Now Collins is back in Connell’s latest novel, SPOILS OF VICTORY, which is again set in Germany in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

This time, the action centers on the small town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, where extortion and corruption are rife and the black market flourishes. Mason’s friend, Counter Intelligence Corps Agent John Winstone, claims that a group of powerful men are taking over the lucrative trade. Winstone is about to share his evidence with Mason when Winstone, along with his girlfriend, is brutally murdered before he can do so. Mason is determined to find those responsible. This is easier said than done in the murky underworld he enters.

His investigation uncovers more deaths—and soon his own life is on the line, too. Mason is not only unsure of who to trust but also aware that some of his past has returned to claw him back to a very dark place. Connell has crafted an intriguing, pacey thriller, and the reader is with Mason every step of the way in trying figure out who is behind the murders.

I really liked Mason as a character and I wondered where Connell drew his inspiration from. “Actually, Mason Collins was a villain in a previous novel, may it rest in peace on my hard drive, but I found him so compelling that I decided to make him my hero in a new novel. This became my first in the Mason Collins series, Ruins of War. Despite Mason’s new status as the protagonist, I wanted him to have the potential to cross over to the dark side, to borrow a well-known phrase, which is only kept in check by a strict moral code. In SPOILS OF VICTORY, the pressure and drive to find the killers drives him close to that dark edge several times.”

As with all the best historical writers, the setting brings an extra life to the novel. Connell has a long-standing passion for history, with a huge interest in World War II since childhood. He more lately came to an era that is less well-known— its aftermath.

Connell says he was staggered by what he found. “Germany had been bombed back to the Middle Ages. Death by famine, disease, and murder had replaced the bullets and bombs. Take Garmisch-Partenkirchen, the setting for SPOILS OF VICTORY: a picturesque town in the Bavarian Alps, with gingerbread houses on Hansel-and-Gretel lanes. But in the first two years after the war, it became the Dodge City of occupied Germany.”
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Spyfall by John Hegenberger

SPYFALL coverBy Karen Harper

It was fun to interview such a versatile author–John Hegenberger writes everything from novels and short stories to nonfiction such as a comic book guide and a silver screen guide.  Here’s what he has to say about his current thriller, SPYFALL.

Please tell us what SPYFALL is about.

In 1959, a hard-luck L.A. PI gets caught up in the international intrigue. It’s chock-full of the popular-culture of the day and based on actual facts. Plus, you won’t believe how close we all came from nuclear holocaust in September 1959.

On your website (and no doubt in much of your varied writing) your motto seems to be HAVE FUN.  Can you expand on this?  In writing?  Reading?  In life in general?  Do your main characters ascribe to this philosophy?

We all want and need to do this, don’t we?  Me, my characters, and my readers; all love to have fun. I mean… isn’t that why we read and write?  A thrill ride doesn’t have to just be scary.

Likewise, I was really intrigued by the fact some of your stories are called “rollicking noir.”  Can you explain this apparent contradiction as reflected in your work, especially SPYFALL?

Things are actually dark for our protagonist, Stan Wade, but he enjoys his chosen profession and surrounds himself with a host of friends who faced death with a smirk. Readers will have fun in Stan’s universe. Like a circus ride, it’s a high-speed, hilarious romp thru 1959 L.A.
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A Question of Inheritance by Elizabeth Edmondson

A Question of Inheritance coverElizabeth Edmondson writes what she likes to call Vintage Mysteries, set in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. They’re stories of love, marriage, families and friendship, where the loyalties, feuds, secrets, and betrayals of the past cast long shadows into the present.

A QUESTION OF INHERITANCE has a very traditional setting: a small English town in the 1950s. Why did you choose this period and location?

The early 1950s in England (these mysteries scan a period from 1953-1954) were a time of transition. The effects of World War II were still being felt, and traces of wartime life lingered with austerity, shortages and rationing. Yet at the same time, people were turning their backs on those grim times and looking forward to a brighter future.

My imaginary cathedral town, Selchester, complete with a castle, is the perfect setting for a traditional English mystery. Selchester is a strong community, full of gossip and interesting characters who are more or less affected by the events that unfold in the book, including murder.

You have a series title: Very English Mysteries. Are the books linked?

Yes, they are, although each book is self-standing. The main characters return in this second mystery, including the sleuth, Hugo Hawksworth, and his chief collaborators including a closet novelist, a belligerent teenage girl and a suave Catholic priest. I like developing a place and a supporting cast book by book, and so many of the minor characters will also feature in multiple instalments.

He’s English, of course?

Yes. He’s an intelligence officer who took a bullet in the leg while on a mission in Berlin and has had to take a desk job in Selchester at Thorn Hall, a secret government establishment. He has a strong sense of justice and an inquisitive nature, so when in the first book A Man of Some Repute, the body of the long lost Earl of Selchester is unearthed under the flagstones at the castle, Hugo wants to get to the truth of who killed him. And he’s ably aided and abetted by the dead earl’s niece, Freya.
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The Third Place by J. Sydney Jones

THird PlaceBy Karen Harper

I was pleased to interview J. Sydney Jones because I love and write historical novels, and I’d read an earlier book of his for a review a while ago. My endorsement of his earlier “Viennese Mystery” said something like this: What Arthur Conan Doyle did for Victorian London and Caleb Carr did for old New York, J. Sydney Jones does for Vienna. This multi-talented author really brings place and character alive! And how perfect for an author to have lived for years in the setting for his mystery series.


THE THIRD PLACE is the sixth installment in my Viennese Mystery series, set at the turn of the twentieth century and featuring private inquiries agent Advokat Karl Werthen and his partner in crime detection, the real-life father of criminology, the Austrian Hanns Gross.

In this series addition, Werthen and Gross investigate the murder of Herr Karl, a renowned headwaiter at one of Vienna’s premier cafés. As the investigation turns up new clues, Werthen and Gross are suddenly interrupted in their work by a person they cannot refuse. They are commissioned to locate a missing letter from the emperor to his mistress, the famous actress Katharina Schratt. Franz Josef is desperate for the letter not to fall into the wrong hands, for it contains a damning secret. As the intrepid investigators press on with this new investigation, they soon discover that there has also been an attempt to assassinate the emperor. Eventually, Werthen and Gross realize that the case of the murdered headwaiter and the continuing plot to kill the emperor are connected, and they now face their most challenging and dangerous investigation yet.

Of all the writers I’ve known or interviewed, you seem to have written in the most formats and genres:  fiction and nonfiction and within those parameters, narrative history, mysteries, and stand-alone thrillers.  You were a correspondent and freelance writer throughout Europe.  Which came first for you and do you have a favorite?  Is one form more challenging?

And may I add juvenile fiction to that mix. I published a YA novel a few years back, Frankie, about the Ludlow massacre, and my middle grade novel, Bach Is Back, will be out next year.
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A Pattern of Lies by Charles Todd

The Dangerous Life of a World War I Nurse

Pattern of Lies hcBy Dawn Ius

Caroline and Charles Todd certainly aren’t the first mother/child team to co-write fiction—but for this duo, with more than two dozen thrilling books under their collective belts, writing together is a natural progression of their already close relationship.

As long as they’re not in the same room.

With the release of PATTERN OF LIES, the team’s seventh book in the popular Beth Crawford series, Caroline and Charles took some time with The Big Thrill to reflect on what made them join forces creatively, where this book takes readers, and what fans can expect next.

“When we started working together, we were over 400 miles apart,” Charles says. “So in many ways it was like working on your own, with somebody else there to talk about it. We still can’t write in the same room though—too easy to get off topic.”

“We were both history buffs, we’d seen a lot of the same movies, read many of the same books, loved going to England,” Caroline adds. “I had come to a point where I wanted to do something different and Charles was at a point where he wanted to do something else on business trips besides the bar scene or watching TV.”

To their amazement, it was an easy transition, particularly given their family’s great love of storytelling.

“After the first couple of weeks, I don’t think it mattered to me that I was working with ‘Mom,’ ” Charles says. “”She’s smart, she had something to say and so did I, and soon we were so wrapped up in the characters and the story that our relationships was nowhere near as important as what was happening on the computer pages. Caroline was the person on the other end of the phone call or e-mail, and each conversation resulted in a new way of thinking or a change in direction of a fresh view of a character—and a challenge for both of us to get it right. That makes for good writing.”

As evidenced by their long-standing partnership and multiple bestsellers. Together, they’ve written two stand-alone mysteries, eighteen books in the Ian Rutledge series, and seven books featuring Bess Crawford, a World War I British Army nurse. As with all series characters, Bess has grown with each book, but her beginnings were inspired by a gap in Caroline and Charles’ own storytelling that they felt needed to be filled.
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The Smoke Hunter by Jacquelyn Benson

smokehunterDeadly beasts, improvident rum consumption, and a treasure-hunting suffragette: Jacquelyn Benson’s debut novel, THE SMOKE HUNTER, is a smart, fun ride in the tradition of Indiana Jones and The Mummy.

The Big Thrill caught up with Jacquelyn to chat about genre-bending, magic mirrors, and dangerous men.

Ellie is such a smart protagonist. What inspired you to create her?  

Ellie did not come naturally to me. When I set out to write THE SMOKE HUNTER, I started with the idea of a heroine who was something of a broken woman. I made it almost all the way through my first draft with her and hated almost every minute of it. Then this startlingly clear vision popped into my mind: a woman dragging her suitcase down the pavement, both terrified and exulted by the realization that she was a thief.

I lost the suitcase, but I kept the thievery. Instead of creating someone who was a victim of her circumstances, I found myself writing a woman who reached out and took hold of her own fate. The Ellie who made it into THE SMOKE HUNTER is smart and driven, unafraid of diving into circumstances other women of her time would find unthinkable.

You draw on a lot of history and mythology in THE SMOKE HUNTER. How much of it is true?

Quite a bit, actually. There were, in fact, stories of hidden cities of wealth and power that threaded their way through the Americas during the 17th and 18th centuries, from Mexico to Patagonia. This might simply have been a case of neighboring civilizations sharing and passing along the same myths and stories—or there might have been some sort of truth to them we’ve yet to discover. The same goes for the remarkable similarities between Mayan and Aztec origin stories, right down to the name of the city said to be the birthplace of their civilizations.  Obviously, in THE SMOKE HUNTER, I take a few liberties in offering a slightly fantastic theory of what the City of Seven Caves might have been, but I don’t think we can entirely rule out that there may have been a real place behind these myths.

The Smoking Mirror is actually one way of translating the name of the Aztec god Tezcatlipoca, and disks of polished obsidian have been found in both Mayan and Aztec archaeological sites and are associated with prophecy and sacrifice in their iconography. That association between mirrors and the ability to see into the past and future, or across great distances, is one found in other cultures as well. Remember Snow White’s wicked stepmother?
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To Love a Traitor by JL Merrow

ToLoveATraitor72lgBy John A. Connell

Award-winning author JL Merrow describes herself as a rare beast, an English person who refuses to drink tea. But that’s not all that identifies her. She is also a prolific author. Case in point, TO LOVE A TRAITOR is her thirteenth novel, and she has also written seven novellas and more than fifty short stories. So, while she may eschew the art of drinking tea, her prolific writings clearly demonstrate her embrace of the authorial arts—much to the delight of her fans! She writes gay romance, mostly contemporary romantic comedies and mysteries, with an occasional foray into historical and speculative fiction. Ms. Merrow attributes her alternating between genres to having a short attention span, but anyone who can write that many books and short stories, and has garnered awards and nominations for multiple titles, does not suffer from that particular condition.

TO LOVE A TRAITOR falls into her historical category. Set in England shortly after World War One, Roger Cottingham is faced with a dilemma. He suspects Matthew Connaught spied for the Germans during the war, and that his actions led to his brother’s death during a patrol into no-man’s land. Though Roger worked in Naval intelligence during the war as a cryptographer, he’s certainly not trained to investigate a potentially dangerous traitor. Despite the risks, he is determined to uncover the truth, but what he doesn’t count on is falling in love with the very person he’s investigating. What is he to do if, as the mounting evidence suggests, he finds Matthew guilty? Is he TO LOVE A TRAITOR, or see that Matthew is punished for acts leading to his beloved brother’s death?

JL Merrow was kind enough to answer some questions for The Big Thrill.

I’m sure you’ve had to field this question before, but could you tell us why, as a woman, you tend to write stories with male protagonists?

Honestly? I just feel more comfortable writing about men, particularly for longer works. I think I find it easier to be objective about male characters—women in our society are basically taught to judge themselves against one another (as I’m sure men are too) so when I’m writing about a man and his motivations, I find I have a lot fewer hang-ups!
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The Flawed Dance by Laura Elvebak

stripteaseTHE FLAWED DANCE is a story that has been simmering on my memory burner for 50 years. I finally decided that Erin Matthews, my protagonist, has been waiting too long. She literally demanded I tell her story. I’ve hesitated this long because, in essence, her story parallels mine.

Erin’s story begins in 1968 upon her arrival in Philadelphia, after convincing a co-worker at the restaurant where she worked as a waitress to drive her from New Jersey. She has run away from her long-time lover after hitting him over the head with an iron skillet, rendering him unconscious, if not dead. After being submissive and quiet most of the five years she spent with him, nursing him back to health after he experienced a fall that fractured both feet, and being his constant companion and lover, she is unable to cope with what she has done. Never mind that she was only 22 and Johnny was 52 and running from a hit man sent by the Mob—she never dreamed she would be capable of attempted murder. Guilt becomes her motivator as she seeks redemption.

Erin moves in, sight unseen, with the brother of her driver, an elderly African-American, who once had his own issues with the Mob. As the only white girl in the neighborhood in an era of racial unrest, Erin is determined to make a new life for herself. At the same time she must watch her back in case her past catches up with her.

The steps she has to climb to reach her destination are fraught with hidden dangers, exacerbated by her own naivety and being quick to trust the wrong people. After several missteps and bad decisions, she lands a few jobs, first as a waitress, then a medical transcriber at a hospital, and finally as a go-go dancer. The last pays more than the others but also brings her into the arms of the Mob. Intrigue, betrayal, and murder follow Erin and she must do some fancy footwork to avoid getting killed herself.
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The Rabbi’s Knight by Michael J. Cooper

rabbiThe year is 1290–twilight of the Crusades. War-weary Knight Templar, Jonathan St. Clair, is garrisoned in the port city of Acre and more interested in learning Kabbalah than fighting Moslems. He possesses an ancient scroll with a cryptic inscription, the key to unlocking the secrets of Jerusalem’s Temple Mount.

But none of the Jewish scholars in Acre can decipher the inscription. And time is running out. Acre will soon come under siege, and the one man able to decipher the scroll’s meaning, Rabbi Samuel of Baghdad, has been targeted for assassination.

Deep in enemy territory, St. Clair apprentices himself to Rabbi Samuel as they travel to Jerusalem, risking everything to fulfill their shared and sacred destiny as guardians of the Temple Mount.
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Second Chance by Linell Jeppsen

second chanceThe Wilcox and Son Detective Agency is working on its second case file, but Matthew and his son Chance are beginning to think they might have bit off more than they can chew.

Their investigation into a series of claim-jumps near the booming mining community of Wallace, Idaho, suddenly turns deadly as one witness after another turns up dead. It turns out that the theft of land and mineral rights is only the beginning of a much deeper conspiracy…

Matthew and Chance follow the leads as best they can, knowing full well that their investigation has turned into a game of cat and mouse … but who is the cat in this deadly contest?

Starting in the deep woods of North Idaho and culminating in the finest, most exclusive ballrooms of high society in Seattle, Washington, follow Matthew and Chance Wilcox as they match wits against one of the worst criminals they have ever faced!
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Elisha Rex by E. C. Ambrose

elisha rexBy E. C. Ambrose

On the surface, my work doesn’t have much in common with contemporary medical novels. Today’s thrillers with medical themes often involve highly educated professionals—doctors, nurses, surgeons—while I’m invested in a peasant from the 14th century, whose medical education includes bleeding patients to balance their humors, the belief that water spreads disease, and the use of human anatomical charts based on pig dissections.

My adventure-based historical fantasy series, the Dark Apostle, which continues July 2 with ELISHA REX, began with reading far too many books about medieval medicine, until the facts and the anecdotes exploded into the idea for a story. My research began with a single title: Devils, Drugs, and Doctors by Howard W. Haggard, M. D. I have the Pocket Book edition of 1940, the fifteenth printing of a work that first came out in 1929.

This is a rambling and engaging popular volume which follows the history of medicine through a variety of approaches, none of which involve footnotes or a bibliography. It frames this history through the window of childbirth, a common biological event, yet one fraught with risk for both mother and child. I wouldn’t recommend this book as a sole reference, but as a source of inspiration for medical fiction, it’s a treasure trove. It doesn’t shy away from lurid tales and speculations, but includes lots of quotes from historical sources, including illustrations and broadsheets from the past. It is, in short, just the sort of work that gets a writer curious, then excited, to learn more.

Mid-way through reading Devils, Drugs, and Doctors, I had an idea for a character, a barber-surgeon, during a problematic childbirth. This is when the true research began. I drilled into Haggard’s text, searching for other references, finding more books, and running my interlibrary loan librarian a bit ragged in my quest for knowledge. It also led me to Kalamazoo, to the International Medieval Congress, an annual gathering of medieval scholars, and a great place to pick up ideas and research materials.
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Steam, Smoke & Mirrors by Colin Edmonds

steamBy Karen Harper

debut-authorColin Edmonds is a writer who wears many hats—including his unique debut novel, STEAM, SMOKE & MIRRORS A successful script and comedy writer for British TV, he has written a steampunk thriller/mystery with brilliant characters.  As an Anglophile and lover of Victoriana, I was amazed at the book’s range of plot and people, the real and the fictional.  Ladies and gentlemen—sit back and enjoy (and be frightened) for the show is about to begin!

What is your novel about?  

STEAM, SMOKE & MIRRORS is set in the swirling fog-filled streets of London in 1899. It’s a thriller-mystery which chronicles the adventures, often misadventures, of a couple of Music Hall/Vaudeville stage magicians who are reluctantly seconded by Superintendent William Melville of London’s Metropolitan Police Special Branch (the forerunner of the British Secret Service MI-5) to help solve the unsolvable. You know, those uncanny curiosities, unfathomable mysteries, bizarre and arcane crimes which defy logic and, frankly, baffle the authorities. My magicians, who also work a twice nightly show at The Metropolitan Theatre of Steam Smoke & Mirrors in West London’s Edgware Road, are the devastatingly handsome Michael Magister, Bronx-born conjuror who has performed in England for just over a decade, and his equally brilliant, drop-dead gorgeous British assistant Phoebe Le Breton.

Because magicians are masters of misdirection, deception, sleight of hand, and all manner of subterfuge, Michael and Phoebe are the Special Branch’s obvious go-to advisers when mysterious crimes start getting just a little too weird.

In this opening case, a former Music Hall hypnotist has escaped from Hanwell Asylum, vowing to murder all the performers who appeared in her final show. Michael and Phoebe must employ all their cunning and experience chasing down this mind-bending killer, whose gruesome revenge makes The Ripper look like a novice. Especially as Michael Magister’s name appears on her Death List.

As the murders mount up and the mystery unravels, history-changing secrets are revealed; not only magic trick secrets and state secrets, but the secrets Michael and Phoebe have been keeping from one another.

All this is set against an exotic backdrop of national conspiracies and steampunk. But is anything what it seems? Or is it all steam, smoke, and mirrors?
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