Cozy Mystery

Braking For Bodies by Duffy Brown

Launch Isn’t Just for Rockets!

Braking for BodiesBy Duffy Brown

All my life I thought launch was what those really smart science people do to get something into space. And never in all those years did I expect to be involved. Yet, here I am dong a launch of my own. Not that I’m putting a rocket in space—though right now that seems like a snap—but I’m launching a book.

What do you mean launch? I asked my publisher. As I knew it, the book comes out on a specific day, booksellers put it up for sale, end of story. Done.

Right, as if anything is ever that easy. To launch BRAKING FOR BODIES, the second book in my Cycle Path mystery series, I though it would be fun to do something different. I’ll have a mystery party at my house, I decided! I have the house, I like parties. A match made in heaven. Sixty is a nice number and I can just buy one of those interactive mystery party game things online. Piece of cake.

You can see where this is going, can’t you? Murphy’s Law on steroids.

First off, there are no mystery parties online for sixty people that has everyone involved all the time, and I wanted everyone to have skin in the game. That means I have to write the mystery. And if people are coming to my house, I have to feed them and drink them.

Thirty years ago I decided I wanted kids, and my husband went along with it. That gave me four free waiters and barkeeps for my party. It took me a week to write the party with characters and clues and make it all interactive so that everyone could be the killer or the victim or have something to do with the deadly deed.

A few things I discovered along the way. The most important is the more alcohol, the better the party—and my ability to write the mystery. The second is that your friends are there for fun more than finding out who-done-it. And did I mention the alcohol?
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A Muddied Murder by Wendy Tyson

A Muddied Murder front cover--TysonBy Karen Harper

While Wendy and I were  doing this interview, I found an excellent review of A MUDDIED MURDER in Publishers Weekly, so I was able to send it to Wendy.  PW also included a picture of the cover with fresh veggies, which made me wish winter was over so I could get going in the garden.  Not only is this an excellent who-done-it but also an intriguing why-done-it.  The timing could not be better for this excellent read by a multi-talented author.

What is A MUDDIED MURDER about?  

A MUDDIED MURDER features attorney-turned-organic farmer/amateur sleuth Megan Sawyer.  When Megan gives up her big-city law career to care for her grandmother and run the family’s organic farm and café, she expects to find peace and tranquility in her scenic hometown of Winsome, Pennsylvania. Instead, her goat goes missing, rain muddies her fields, the town denies her business permits, and her family’s Colonial-era farm sucks up the remains of her savings.

Just when she thinks she’s reached the bottom of the rain barrel, Megan and the town’s hunky veterinarian discover the local zoning commissioner’s battered body in her barn. Megan is thrust into the middle of a murder investigation—and she’s the chief suspect. It’s up to Megan to dig through small-town secrets, local politics, and old grievances in time to find a killer before that killer strikes again.

You stress on your excellent website that you admire and write about strong women in your mysteries.  How does your main character in A MUDDIED MURDER, Megan Sawyer, fit that description?

While “strength” can be defined in several ways, when I think of strong women—or people, for that matter—I think of individuals who are able to overcome difficult circumstances. Megan hasn’t had an easy life. Abandoned by her mother at a young age, she was brought up by her father and grandmother in the small town of Winsome, PA.  After finally getting her life on track, she loses her young husband while he is serving in Afghanistan.  Returning to Winsome and starting the farm and café is, for Megan, a show of strength and determination and an act of faith. Not only does she have to overcome the very tangible obstacles presented to her—starting and maintaining the farm, dealing with local politics, managing her limited financial means, finding a killer—but she has to recognize and help to heal her own emotional scars as well.
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A Clue in the Stew by Connie Archer

Clue In The Stew_coverBy Jaden Terrell

Connie Archer describes her path to a writing career as “somewhat sideways.” Her first love was acting, and from childhood, when she first heard a soap opera on the radio, she set her sights on screen and stage. Although she pursued a degree in Biology and another in English Literature, she spent most of her adult life as an actress, and never imagined she’d be a published author.

The reality of being an actor, though (especially in television), is that most jobs aren’t that exciting. One day, Archer found herself on set, bored out of her skull. This creative frustration inspired her to try writing. She’d always been a huge fan of mysteries and thrillers, so she gathered her courage and attempted to write one. But books are like potato chips; you can’t write just one. Now unveiling her fifth cozy mystery, A CLUE IN THE STEW, Connie agreed to chat with The Big Thrill about her path to publishing.

What gave you the idea to center the series on a soup shop?

I wish I could say this brilliant idea occurred to me all by myself. I mean what could be more bucolic than Vermont?  Or cozier than a soup shop?  But it happened this way—I finished my first book and was very lucky and blessed to find a wonderful agent, who shopped it around. I wrote two more books in that series, but a couple of years passed with no takers, and one day my agent called and asked, “How would you feel about work for hire?”

And that was for the Soup Lover’s series from Berkley Prime Crime?

That’s right. I think my agent thought of me because she knew I’d grown up in New England, Boston actually, and I do love to make soup. I hadn’t read a lot of cozy mysteries, so I was nervous about the parameters and what was expected. But I do know New England, and thought the series would be great fun to write.
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The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

madwoman upstairsBy Wendy Tyson

THE MADWOMAN UPSTAIRS is New York City author Catherine Lowell’s debut novel.  The mystery follows Samantha Whipple, the Brontës’ sole living descendant, as she searches for the family’s long-rumored secret estate. The only tools at her disposal? Clues her eccentric father left behind and the Brontës’ own novels.

THE BIG THRILL recently had a chance to catch up with Catherine.

Congratulations on the publication of THE MADWOMAN UPSTAIRS. What can you tell us about the book that’s not on the back cover?

It’s easy to think that a book on the Brontës would involve characters who love books and idolize the Brontës. But The Madwoman Upstairs is about an English major who dislikes most literature—a descendant of the Brontës who doesn’t like the Brontës. How does a reluctant relative go about decoding an old family legacy? Samantha’s journey in the novel is a quest not only to understand her family’s misunderstood past, but to understand literature itself—how to evaluate it, why it matters, and what secrets might be lurking in its pages.

Can you tell us a little more about Samantha Whipple, the main character in THE MADWOMAN UPSTAIRS?  What are some of the elements of Samantha’s past that have made her the woman she is today?  How is Samantha like you? Not like you?

What I love about Samantha is that she’s not afraid to speak her mind, even to her superiors, and even when she has the most at stake. (I wish I could do that more often!) She is both confident and strangely vulnerable, owing to a particularly tragic incident in her past. At the center of her life is her relationship with her late father—a person whose respect she was desperate to gain but whose opinions she recognizes were unorthodox and potentially wrong.
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A Disguise to Die For by Diane Vallere

Disguise To Die For_cover2By Janet Ashby

A DISGUISE TO DIE FOR, out this month from Berkley Prime Crime, is the first cozy mystery in the new Costume Shop mystery series. Margo Tamblyn, a 32 year old working as a magician’s assistant in Las Vegas, comes back to Proper City to temporarily run the family costume shop, Disguise DeLimit, when her father is hospitalized after a heart attack. Soon she is involved in hunting down clues to clear the family friend who helped raise her, Ebony Welles, of suspicion in the murder of a local rich trust fund baby, Blitz Manners.

Please tell us something about yourself. For one, you worked in fashion for 20 years before starting to write.

I’ve liked clothes since as long as I can remember—back to first grade. At one point I wanted to be a designer. After graduating from college with a fine arts degree, I did the logical thing: I went to the mall for a job. Decades (and a few promotions) later, I started to write. My first series character is a former fashion buyer turned amateur sleuth. A perfect example of what you know, right?

Please tell us about your new mystery, A DISGUISE TO DIE FOR. It’s your fourth cozy mystery series?

I wasn’t actively looking for a fourth series. True story: I was in New York and set up a face-to-face meeting with my agent and editor. It was September, and we got to talking about Halloween costumes. I told them that I was making a tiny yeti costume for my teddy bear and described how funny it was to put him into this little suit of white fur that had vampire teeth attached. My agent interrupted the conversation and said, “You should write a costume shop series.” I was ready to leave the table and start writing sample chapters right then and there, but she asked me to hold off until we found out if the publisher was interested. After seeing a proposal and sample chapters, they bought three books.

Why did you start a fourth series? Why a costume shop and an unusual town near Las Vegas?

My first three series all connect to someplace where I’ve lived (Style & Error in Pennsylvania, Madison Night in Texas, and Material Witness in California). I wanted a different setting, and I wanted it to be within driving distance from where I lived so I could absorb the feel of the place without needing to fly. The part of Nevada where I set the costume shop series is right past the California border, which I found interesting because it attracts scofflaws from California and is basically desert, a drive-through toward Las Vegas.

My town is quirky: people like to throw costume parties for any occasion. They’re a community of people who are okay being a small town, though there is the constant threat of incorporation and of local government trying to leverage their location for national attention.
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A Killer Necklace by Melodie Campbell & Cynthia St-Pierre

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000040_00067]By Cynthia St-Pierre

It started innocently—at Bloody Words, Canada’s former national mystery conference, Toronto, 2006.

I had just come out of a 15-minute interview with an agent and was feeling a little shaky from the adrenalin. The lobby of the conference floor of the Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre Hotel was practically empty. Most attendees, fondly dubbed The Usual Suspects, were behind the closed doors of the various conference rooms learning about predators and violent crime from a forensic psychiatrist, or attending other themes sessions.

But in the shadows of an escalator stood one woman. She looked just about as antsy as me, so I walked over and introduced myself.

Melodie had an agent appointment in about ten minutes. Agents aren’t scary. Really.

I wished her friend good luck. We chatted a little more—all about calming our nerves (Agents aren’t scary. Really.)—then arranged to meet at the evening banquet.

As it turns out, after dessert was served that night, Melodie was awarded third prize in the Bony Pete Short Story Contest for “School for Burglars,” a feat which required not luck, but skill. Everyone at the table, including me, was thrilled for her. We eagerly exchanged e-mails. We had to read that winning story!

“School for Burglars” is a fabulous tale, of course. And over the years, Melodie and I exchanged more stories. We offered each other writer support and input. Then we met again at Bloody Words 2008, the year my story “A Terror in Judgement” won second prize. Melodie was sweet when I cried.

Melodie and I were on to something: Not only did we enjoy each other’s company and each other’s writing, we had similar styles. Why not write a mystery novel together?
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Backstabbing In Beaujolais by Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen & Anne Trager (translator)

Backstabbing in Beaulolais_500x800By Kay Kendall

The Winemaker Detective series has a huge following in its native France. To date there are twenty-three mysteries in the series, and a New York-based publishing house, Le French Book, is now translating all of the titles into English. Its founder, translator Anne Trager, has a passion for crime fiction equal to her love for France.

BACKSTABBING IN BEAUJOLAIS, published in English on November 19, is ninth in the series by French authors Jean-Pierre Alaux and Noël Balen. The tenth mystery—Late Harvest Havoc—comes out in December, together with a collection of the first three mysteries, The Winemaker Detective: An Omnibus.

Here, translator Anne Trager talks with The Big Thrill about bringing this beloved French series to an English-speaking audience.

Each book in the Winemaker Detective series is not only a mystery but an homage to wine and the art of making it. Has the series’ growing number of international readers begun to influence the mysteries’ plots?

For both authors, Jean-Pierre Alaux and Noël Balen, the main character has always had an international vocation. Benjamin Cooker is an expert winemaker whose father was British and mother French. He and his young assistant solve mysteries in wine country. The initial mysteries translated so far all take place in France, but next year, one will take place in Hungary. The authors confirm that their intention has always been to have the protagonist travel to wine countries around the world, and the growing international audience makes that choice more and more pertinent. The mysteries have been adapted to television, attracting an audience of over 4 million in France, Belgium, and Switzerland. The authors write two books a year and just told me they will be picking up the pace because of the French television series. We too are picking up the translation pace.
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Guilty As Cinnamon by Leslie Budewitz

guilty as cinnamonBy Jaden Terrell

Leslie Budewitz is a woman of many passions. After thirty years as an attorney, she wrote a guide for writers about criminal law and courtroom procedure, which won the 2011 Agatha Award for Best Nonfiction. Then she decided to combine two of her passions, food and great mysteries, by writing a series of cozy “foodie” mysteries. In 2013, Death al Dente, the first Food Lovers’ Village Mystery, won an Agatha for Best First Novel, making Budewitz the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction.

Her latest novel, GUILTY AS CINNAMON, has all the elements of a great cozy mystery—quirky characters, a unique, well-realized setting, and plenty of conflict. And did I mention the food? In this second Spice Shop Mystery, Budewitz’s knowledge of and love for cooking shine through. Five pages in, spice shop owner Pepper Reece describes a process for making a “gorgeous, fiery, red-orange oil” by heating ground dried peppers in oil and straining the oil off. Despite my lack of the domestic gene, I could hardly wait to try it myself.

The Montana native has a heart for service. She serves as president of Sisters in Crime and is a founding member of the Guppies, the SinC chapter for new and unpublished writers. She generously agreed to answer a few questions for us about her work.

Can you tell us a bit about your writing journey?

I started writing at 4, on my father’s desk. Literally—I did not yet understand the concept of paper. But while l always wanted to be a writer, I didn’t actually think it was something you could do—so I became a lawyer instead. In my late thirties, I decided I really did want to write seriously, though it took more than fifteen years before I held my first book in my hands. In the interim, I wrote several unpublished manuscripts, although a few were agented and came close, and published half a dozen short stories. After Books, Crooks & Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure (Quill Driver Books, 2011) was published, I decided that as much as I love helping other writers get the facts about the law write—er, right—I wasn’t through telling my own stories. I love the light-hearted subset of traditional mystery sometimes called the cozy, and decided to try that genre.
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To Brew Or Not To Brew by Joyce Tremel

ToBrewOrNotToBrew finalBy Janet Ashby

TO BREW OR NOT TO BREW, the debut cozy mystery by Joyce Tremel out on December 1, features Max (Maxine) O’Hara, a certified brewmaster who is opening a brewpub in Pittsburgh. Although there have been minor problems, she rejects the possibility of sabotage until her assistant Kurt is found dead. She sets out to investigate with the help of other small business owners in the neighborhood and her new chef Jake, but then there is another death….

Tell us about your book, TO BREW OR NOT TO BREW.

It’s the first in the Brewing Trouble cozy mystery series being published by Berkley Prime Crime. My protagonist, Max O’Hara, is in the process of opening a brewpub in a Pittsburgh neighborhood and finds herself involved in solving the murder of her assistant. Along the way she gets help from a bakery owner who’s a rabid Steeler fan, a cranky World War II vet, and of course, her new chef, Jake, who was her high school crush.

Details of Pittsburgh life add a nice touch to your mystery. Have you always lived in Pittsburgh?

Yes. I know Pittsburghese and I’m not afraid to use it! The city has gone through a lot of change over the years and it seemed like the perfect place—to me, anyway—to set a light mystery. Pittsburgh is really a small town disguised as a big city and I think it makes a great setting.

I’m not sure what to say about myself. That’s always a hard question to answer! I’ve been married to the love of my life for thirty-five years and we have two grown sons. And a cat.
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The Body In The Landscape by Larissa Reinhart

THE BODY IN THE LANDSCAPE frontBy Karen Harper

I think all writers are interesting in different ways, but Larissa Reinhart amazes me. She may be a southern Georgia girl but she lives in and loves Japan. Go figure—and go figure on getting her next book if you want sassy characters and humor. I was glad to e-meet her.

What is THE BODY IN THE LANDSCAPE about?

The novel is the fifth Cherry Tucker mystery. Cherry’s a struggling portrait painter from small town Halo, Georgia. Her sassy spitfire reputation has her in trouble back home, so when invited to paint the winning portrait for Big Rack Lodge’s Hogzilla hunt contest, it seems like a paid vacation. While landscape painting she discovers the body of local ne’er-do-well and, of course, embroils herself in hunting for the killer. Which is not the brightest of ideas when surrounded by hunters. Just sayin’.

Where does your Cherry Tucker series, of which this is a part, fit in the category of “cozy mysteries”?  Is there a range of cozies or sub-genres within?

I think it depends on where you’re looking. For example on the big sites—like Amazon—the Cherry Tucker Mysteries are listed under Amateur Sleuth, Humor, and Cozies, with a subgenera of Crafts and Hobbies (as opposed to Culinary or Animals).

In some conferences I’ve attended, we’ve discussed a new genre for cozies, the “modern cozy” which calls for more action, stronger language, and more sexual situations than traditional cozies. The Cherry Tuckers definitely have a strong romantic component, but I’m aware of my audience in terms of language and sex (I always say the books get a PG-13 rating). However, I try to drive scenes with action and dialogue rather than the slower pacing of traditional cozies.
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The Skeleton Haunts a House by Leigh Perry

Untitled-4By Ovidia Yu

THE SKELETON HAUNTS A HOUSE is the third in the delightfully quirky Family Skeleton series featuring English professor Georgia Thackery who is a single mom with—literally—a skeleton in her family closet.

Leigh Perry (who also writes as Toni L.P. Kelner) answers some questions about her wisecracking living skeleton, Sid, and her new book.

How would you describe Sid to someone who loves your books but is afraid of skeletons?

Why would anybody be afraid of a skeleton? After all, we’re all skeletons under the skin.

Huh. I just Googled it and found yes, there are people who are afraid of skeletons. Some are actually afraid of their own skeletons. To those people I can say only that they should read another book. Sid is not a metaphor—he’s an actual human skeleton. If it helps, he is a clean skeleton—I’m not fond of nasty ones with bits and pieces still attached. But still, if you don’t like skeletons, this is just not the book for you.

Can you tell us something about THE SKELETON HAUNTS A HOUSE without giving too much away?

It’s Halloween in Pennycross, and Sid can’t wait to go into the town’s haunted house attraction. Then a dead body is found in the haunt—the real kind of dead, not the faux kind—and Sid and his BFF Georgia step in to catch a killer. Along the way, there are family complications, academic anxiety, carnival rides, and romance. (Not for Sid and Georgia. That would be icky.)

Sid dresses in costume again, but I don’t want to give away what he’s wearing.
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Pane and Suffering by Cheryl Hollon

paneTo solve her father’s murder and save the family-owned glass shop, Savannah Webb must shatter a killer’s carefully constructed façade. . .

After Savannah’s father dies unexpectedly of a heart attack, she drops everything to return home to St. Petersburg, Florida, to settle his affairs–including the fate of the beloved, family-owned glass shop. Savannah intends to hand over ownership to her father’s trusted assistant and fellow glass expert, Hugh Trevor, but soon discovers the master craftsman also dead of an apparent heart attack.

As if the coincidence of the two deaths wasn’t suspicious enough, Savannah discovers a note her father left for her in his shop, warning her that she is in danger. With the local police unconvinced, it’s up to Savannah to piece together the encoded clues left behind by her father. And when her father’s apprentice is accused of the murders, Savannah is more desperate than ever to crack the case before the killer seizes a window of opportunity to cut her out of the picture. . .
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Killer Run by Lynn Cahoon

killer runJill Gardner—owner of Coffee, Books, and More—has somehow been talked into sponsoring a 5k race along the beautiful California coast. The race is a fundraiser for the local preservation society—but not everyone is feeling so charitable…

The day of the race, everyone hits the ground running…until a local business owner stumbles over a very stationary body. The deceased is the vicious wife of the husband-and-wife team hired to promote the event—and the husband turns to Jill for help in clearing his name. But did he do it? Jill will have to be very careful, because this killer is ready to put her out of the running…forever!

“Murder, dirty politics, pirate lore, and a hot police detective: Guidebook to Murder has it all! A cozy lover’s dream come true.”
—Susan McBride, author of The Debutante Dropout Mysteries
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Peril by Ponytail by Nancy J. Cohen

PerilbyPonytailBy Janet Ashby

Marla Vail is a hairdresser living in South Florida who gets involved in sleuthing and finding murderers. In PERIL BY PONYTAIL, the twelfth in the Bad Hair Day series of cozy mysteries by Nancy J. Cohen, Marla is on a belated honeymoon with her homicide detective husband Dalton to a large dude ranch in Arizona run by his cousins to help find who is causing malicious mischief there. And then the murders start….

Tell us about the Bad Hair Day series and PERIL BY PONYTAIL, out this month.

The mysteries feature hairstylist Marla Vail née Shore, who first meets Detective Dalton Vail in Permed to Death. Ten books later, they get married in Shear Murder. But there’s no rest for our sleuths. They move into a new home in Hanging by a Hair, where they discover a dead body next door. Finally, Marla and Dalton go on a honeymoon in PERIL BY PONYTAIL

Marla isn’t thrilled about a honeymoon in the desert. She’s dreamed about lying on a lounge chair at a tropical beach with palm fronds swaying overhead. But Dalton has accepted an invitation to stay at his cousin’s ranch where trouble is brewing. The cousin hopes that Dalton, a homicide detective, can help determine the source of sabotage at the dude ranch and at a ghost town Dalton’s uncle is renovating. Things go downhill fast from the moment the newlyweds arrive when a local forest ranger is found dead.

Why did you choose South Florida as your setting? Why Arizona?

I live in South Florida, so it’s easy to do research in my own backyard. Plus Florida has so much diversity in terms of ecology, demographics, history, quaint towns, and more that a wealth of material exists for a mystery series. All I need to do is read the newspaper for ideas.
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Beyond A Doubt by Nancy Cole Silverman

BEYOND A DOUBT front mockWhen Carol Childs is called to the scene of a body dump she has no idea she’s about to uncover a connection to a string of missing girls. Young, attractive women, drawn to the glitz and glamor of Hollywood via an internet promise of stardom and romance, have been disappearing. A judge’s daughter leaves behind a clue and a trip down Hollywood Boulevard’s Walk of Fame reveals a connection to a high powered real estate mogul and to a cartel targeting girls for human trafficking.

Old Hollywood has its secrets, its impersonators and backdoor entrances to old speakeasies and clubs where only those with the proper credentials can go. And when Carol Childs gets too close, she finds herself politically at odds with powers that threaten to undue her career and like the very girls she’s seeking, disappear.

*****

“A high-speed chase of a mystery, filled with very likable characters, a timely plot, and writing so compelling that readers will be unable to turn away from the page.” ~Kings River Life Magazine

“This book was a real nail-biter! It kept my attention the entire time. A definite must read. ~Goodreads Review
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Cracks in the Cobblestone by Susan E. Sagarra

Cover-CracksintheCobblestone - FINAL SMALL - 3-25-15debut-authorSusan E. Sagarra’s debut mystery novel, CRACKS IN THE COBBLESTONE, is the story of two vastly different women who have a mutual obsession with the Titanic tragedy. That calamity presents itself to each woman in different ways to help solve a long-forgotten mystery in the quirky river town of Tirtmansic.

Sagarra has always been intrigued with the historic catastrophe. “I have an unexplained fascination with, or connection to, the Titanic disaster, and my lucky number is 12,” she said. “When I set out to write my book, I looked at the calendar the day I started writing and it was April 12, 2010. So I decided to start part of the novel on April 12 . . . of 1912. I did not even think about the year’s significance until I researched important events and realized the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, three days after I had determined my written journey would begin.”

But this was only one of several coincidences along the way. Several years earlier, when Sagarra was the managing editor of a St. Louis, Missouri-based newspaper, she had been invited to see the Titanic exhibit at the Saint Louis Science Center. “At the beginning of the exhibit, they give you a ‘boarding pass’ that depicts a real passenger who was on the ship and you have the opportunity to experience the event as that person,” Sagarra said. “The pass gives details about the person and my passenger, a woman named Mrs. Edward Beane (Ethel Clark), was one of just twelve newlywed brides on the ship. At the end of the exhibit, you find out if ‘you’ survived. She did.”

Sagarra dug out the boarding pass from her trunk of memorabilia and researched Ethel Beane. She ended up paying homage to Mrs. Beane in the book.

The next serendipitous event occurred when she received a gift from her brother. “He gave me a book called I Survived the Titanic, by Lawrence Beesley. Mr. Beesley described how he had survived in lifeboat No. 13, which spooked me. He was in the same boat as Ethel Beane. My brother did not know I describe this woman in my novel when he gave me the present.”
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Dream a Little Scream by Mary Kennedy

By Mary Kennedy

Seven Things You Really Want To Know About Dreams

dream a little screamAs a practicing psychologist, I find that my clients are fascinated by dreams. Most of them have read a little Freud, who called dreams “the royal road to the unconscious.” Freud believed dreams can help us access our innermost thoughts; our fears, wishes, and desires. Think of dreams as a window into our unconscious life. They can be humorous, erotic, tantalizing or terrifying.

When I came up with the premise of the Dream Club Mysteries, I envisioned a group of Savannah women who would meet once a week to eat some fabulous Southern desserts and talk about their dreams. And of course, they would solve a murder or two in every book. I thought this might be an intriguing plot device and could pave the way for some interesting characterization.

As the women reveal their dreams, they realize that they held hidden clues to the crime scene, usually in symbolic form. Sometimes they even uncover the identity of the murderer. But were these clues really “revelations” from the subconscious or merely coincidences? I remembered Freud’s claim, “There are no coincidence.” I chose to sidestep the question and leave it up to the reader to decide.

When I’m asked to speak on dreams, I find that people have strong beliefs—and sometimes misconceptions—about dreams. Here are a few questions I’ve come across.

You can only dream about things you’ve experienced in real life. Is this true?

No, of course not. Anything can happen in a dream. You can take on a new persona, explore lands both real and imaginary, and have adventures worthy of Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean. Since dreams are not subject to time and space constraints, you can share a plate of marrons with Marie Antoinette (“Let them eat cake!”) one night and be part of the first space mission (“Houston, we have a problem”) the following evening.
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Flambé in Armagnac by Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen, and Sally Pane (translator)

flambeBy Sally Pane

Imagine yourself in a corner of France, with its customs and history, its Armagnac and duck confit. Then add some mystery. That was my world as I translated FLAMBE IN ARMAGNAC, the French title of this latest installment in the Winemaker Detective series by Jean-Pierre Alaux and Noël Balen.

In the heart of Gascony, a fire ravages the warehouse of one of Armagnac’s top estates, killing the master distiller. Wine expert Benjamin Cooker is called in to estimate the value of the losses. But Cooker and his assistant Virgile want to know more. How did the old alembic explode? Was it really an accident? Why is the estate owner Baron de Castayrac penniless? How legal are his dealings?

The deeper the winemaking detective digs, the more suspicious he becomes. There is more than one disgruntled inhabitant in this small town. As readers are witness to the time-honored process of Armagnac distillation, the day-to-day activities of the hunt, the marketplace, and the struggles for power within the community, they get a glimpse of the traditions of southwestern France. Similarly, they are introduced to characters from all walks of life—landed gentry with noble titles, former aristocrats contriving to hold on to their status, and the working-class salt of the earth. Each has a story to tell, and Cooker has to listen carefully in order to piece together the mystery of the Chateau Blanzac inferno.

One of the colorful characters in the story is the “roving distiller,” a man who inherited the craft of turning wine into Armagnac by way of an intricate yet medieval-looking machine called an alembic that he hauls from estate to estate with his tractor. The transformation of simple alcohol into the highly prized eau-de-vie seems symbolic of complex human relationships the reader encounters in the village.
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Crushed Velvet by Diane Vallere

CrushedVelvet_coverBy Diane Vallere

Last September, news of a drug laundering operation in the Los Angeles fashion and textile district hit the airwaves. Officially called Operation Fashion Police by the FBI, the raid resulted in a haul of multi-millions of dollars cash, all in hundred dollar bills. The money was profit from the narcotics trade, most of it discovered in duffle bags and cardboard boxes. Several of the boxes were even conveniently marked “1 million.”

Now that was nice, don’t you think? Criminals labeling their own evidence.

The raid was considered to be the largest in history. Current reports state the combined value of cash and property seized at $140 million. Nine arrests were made. All pled not guilty.

The gist of the laundering operation was this: Mexican drug cartels in the United States gave bags of cash to businesses in the Los Angeles fashion district, who used the money to make or import products that would then be sold to Mexican distributors for pesos. The pesos were returned to the Mexican drug cartel.

Simplified, it would be like me selling drugs and then giving you the money I made to buy widgets. You then sold the widgets to a third party and gave me the money you made. I put the clean—laundered—money in the bank and no one would be the wiser. Seems simple, right?
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Laying Down the Paw by Diane Kelly

laying down pawBy Diane Kelly

Readers often want to know where writers find their inspiration. Some writers find inspiration in the headlines. Others find it in the people around them or in experiences they’ve had. In the case of my Paw Enforcement K-9 cop series, inspiration simply licked my ankle. One look down at my black and tan Shepherd mix and I realized a dog like him would make a great character for a mystery series.

Yep, I’m a big animal lover. My husband and I share our home with three dogs and six cats. Being outnumbered more than four-to-one by furry, four-footed creatures qualifies me as a “crazy cat lady” and violates a number of city ordinances. Still, even though I can’t get out of my house without fur on my clothes, I wouldn’t have it any other way. Along with the plastic poop bags and hacked-up hairballs, my dogs and cats bring love and laughter to our lives.

One of the wonderful things about dogs is their emotional honesty. Dogs don’t hide their feelings. If they’re happy, their wagging tail lets you know it. If they’re feeling threatened, the ears go back and the teeth come out. If they don’t want to move from their favorite spot on the couch, they give you a look of unmistakable disdain that says, “I was here first. Buzz off, mere human.”
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Worked to Death by Kerri Nelson

Worked to Death final-1Reluctant med-school drop-out Mandy Murrin has a new job and a new mission. She will find a way to have a social life in small town Alabama if it kills her. After all, she deserves a little fun after surviving the daily grind as a blue collar working stiff. And she has plenty of time for dating after putting in glamorous shifts as a tow truck operator, earning extra cash as lab technician at B Positive Clinic, and being a caretaker to her younger sister with special needs.

Okay, maybe not “plenty,” but she is more than ready to find a good man. Only, the man she finds just happens to be dead and in the trunk of a car.

When an old friend asks for her help, Mandy knows she must make a dent in solving this puzzle before the killer retires another victim. But will she get to the bottom of it before the culprit can cover his tracks, or will she reach a dead-end of her very own?
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Roses Are Dead My Love by Penny Clover Petersen

Roses Are Dead My Love by Penny Clover PetersenBy Jessica Driscoll

ROSES ARE DEAD, MY LOVE is the second book featuring the ever-curious and entertaining sisters, Rose and Daisy Forrest. These cozy mysteries offer a host of plot twists, intrigue, and enjoyable characters, notable among this last group being the sisters’ feisty, quirky, yet insightful mother, Angela Forrest.

In this second instalment of the series, Daisy and Rose have enjoyed a quiet six months until strange things begin happening in Old Towne once again. With a local jogger engaged in obscene indiscretions, mysterious mail mishaps, and a host of other misfortunes, ROSES ARE DEAD, MY LOVE promises to lead the reader on another “Nancy Drew”–type investigation.

“The ladies do have quite a bit of fun breaking and entering, or ‘opening and entering’ as they see it,” says Penny Clover Petersen. “And Angela’s prowess with her new Super-Shooter is rather entertaining.”

Not to mention “the secret Rose’s new boyfriend, Peter Fleming, is hiding,” adds Petersen. “He appears to be a nice, regular sort of man, if a little pretentious, but not all is at it seems.”

Sounds like the start of an excellent adventure, worthy of a cozy chair and a good cocktail, right? Check out Petersen’s website for Forrest-approved recipes. The sisters appear to have a “drink” for everything.

An avid reader and lover of well-written, engaging books, Petersen admits that a run of “bad” books was the primary motivator for her putting pen to paper. “At one point about seven years ago, I had been reading a string of really awful books and complaining loudly that ‘I could write better than this.’ My husband suggested that instead of whining, I should just write one.”
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The Cat Sitter’s Whiskers by John Clement

The Cat Sitter’s Whiskers by John ClementBy Ovidia Yu

First, would you tell us something about THE CAT SITTER’S WHISKERS?

Funny you should ask! It just came out last month. It’s the tenth book in The Dixie Hemingway Mystery Series, published by St. Martins/Minotaur and created by my mom, Blaize Clement. It’s my third book. I took over the series after my mom passed away in 2011, just after she’d put the finishing touches on Book #7. The books are all designed to stand alone on their own, but there’s an arc to Dixie’s personal life that started with the very first book, CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT SITTER, and is continuing even as we speak (I’m just now finishing up book #11, which will be out next year).

It’s fascinating how you came to continue the Cat Sitter series. In a previous interview you described your initial response to the suggestion: “I was horrified. My mother was thrilled.” What has been most difficult about taking on Blaize Clement’s legacy—and what most rewarding?

Yeah, I think that’s still a pretty good summation of my feelings at the time. My mother was diagnosed with cancer in 2009. She had chemotherapy early on, but eventually decided to end treatment, partially because it wasn’t working very well, but also because she wanted to be in control of her final days and enjoy them—to “die well” as she described it. That decision meant a couple of things: one, she knew with certainty what was going to happen, and two, she had time to plan. It was her long-time editor at St. Martins, Marcia Markland, that suggested I continue the series, and when my mom asked what I thought, I didn’t even hesitate. I said no. I think I might have said hell no. Honestly, I just didn’t think I was capable of writing a full-length book, let alone a series with new installments practically every year. At that point, the longest thing I’d published was a feature for The Chicago Sun Times, not much more than three or four thousand words, plus I didn’t think I could really do the series justice. And I didn’t think the readers would accept it. And blah blah blah. I had a million excuses. Eventually, though, I changed my mind, largely due to my mom’s not-so-subtle reminders that a good son doesn’t say no to his mother, especially at her deathbed.
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Mayhem in Margaux by Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen and Sally Pane (translator)

Mayhem in Margaux  by  Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen AND Sally Pane (translator)By Janet Ashby

MAYHEM IN MARGAUX, on sale this month, is the sixth in the Wine Detective series by Jean-Pierre Alaux and Noel Balen. In this cozy series, wine expert Benjamin Cooker and his assistant Virgile become involved in helping solve wine-related mysteries throughout southern France. In MAYHEM the Bordeaux area is in the midst of a summer heat wave threatening the wine grapes when the brash new manager of a Margaux wine estate suffers a fatal accident. We were able to ask the translator, Sally Pane, about the latest volume and the Wine Detective series.

This is the sixth book, out of twenty-three published in France, to be published in English. It doesn’t seem necessary to read the earlier books to enjoy this one but could you give us some background on the earlier books?

Each book in the series can be read as a stand-alone, but they also each round out our understanding of the characters. In Treachery in Bordeaux, wine consultant Benjamin Cooker hires his assistant Virgile. After that, in Grand Cru Heist, Nightmare in Burgundy, Deadly Tasting, Cognac Conspiracies and MAYHEM IN MARGAUX the characters face different mysteries, and as readers we explore different wine regions.

A special charm of the series is the portrayal of quotidian life outside of Paris—in southwestern France—and the insider look at winemaking. In MAYHEM there are enjoyable digressions on summering at a rental villa in Cap Ferrat, the beautiful stones of the Medoc, and corks versus screw tops as well as a touching scene of Benjamin with his daughter visiting from New York. Do each of the books also touch on some current social issue such as gentrification or illegal immigrants?

The authors say themselves that each book is a special homage to a wine, its winemakers and its region, and with each they explore various aspects of everyday winemaking and its struggles: gentrification eating up vineyards, black market trafficking of grand crus, local superstitions, scars from World War II, foreign buyouts, and illegal immigrants being used to cut costs. At the same time, they remain light mysteries, much more about the detail and experience of that part of France.
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Demise In Denim by Duffy Brown

Demise In Denim by Duffy BrownIced Chiffon by Duffy Brown

All my life I thought launch was what really smart rocket scientists do to get something into space. Never in all those years did I expect to be involved in one. Yet here I am dong a launch of my very own. Not that I’m putting a rocket in space—though right now that seems like a snap—but I’m launching a book.

“What do you mean launch?” I asked my publisher. “The book comes out on a specific day, booksellers, B&N and Amazon put it up for sale, end of story. Done. Right?”

Wrong. To launch my first cozy mystery, ICED CHIFFON, I though it would be fun to do something different. I’ll have a mystery party at my house, I decided, with a real live mystery for the guests to solve. I have the house and I like parties. A match made in heaven.

Sixty is a nice number and I can just buy one of those interactive mystery party packs online and set up the mystery event based on that. Piece of cake.

You can see where this is going, can’t you? Murphy’s Law on steroids.

First off, there are no mystery party packs for sixty online. They had packs for twelve, but not five times the number. That meant I’d have to write the mystery. And if people are coming to my house I have to serve food and beverages.
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Heat Trap by J. L. Merrow

Heat Trap by J. L. MerrowBy Charlie Cochrane

Jamie Merrow has been writing since Noah was a boy; her quirky, humorous style is ideally suited to the romances she cut her writing teeth on. She turned to writing crime with the Pressure Head series, of which HEAT TRAP is the third book.

When she isn’t plotting the perfect felony or finding new situations for old complications, she’s adept at extracting money from sponsors as part of her role on the organising team of the author/reader/blogger event “UK Meet.” That has also enabled her to experience being on the acquisitions team for a short story anthology, the ideal opportunity for the poacher to turn gamekeeper and see things from the publisher’s side of the fence. Maybe every author should have that chance, then they’d really understand why following the submission guidelines is so important!

Jamie, I have to ask. How on earth can an English rose like you not drink tea?

With the greatest of pleasure. Vile stuff. You know it makes your insides go brown, right? Now, I’ve nothing against a nice herbal tisane, such as peppermint, ginger, or something fruity with cinnamon. Coffee, it should go without saying, is the nectar of the gods. But Camellia sinensis is not, it’s safe to say, one of my best buds (see what I did there?). Anyway, as you hint, I’m so very English—and so very obviously English—that my dislike of dried leaves boiled in water with milk squirted out of a cow is probably all that saves me from slipping into self-parody.
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Assault and Pepper by Leslie Budewitz

Assault and Pepper by Leslie Budewitz

By Dawn Ius

Leslie Budewitz started writing at the age of four—on her father’s desk. Literally. She would scrawl on top of the wood with her crayons, pencils, or whatever she could find.

Thankfully, her parents were understanding, and to this day, Budewitz’s mother, now eighty-nine, buys her daughter notebooks and pens for Christmas, a loving reminder about the concept of paper.

Harriet the Spy inspired Budewitz to use the notebooks, a habit still, but she concedes they’re more of a journal than a secret spy record.

In them, she jots ideas for recipes and stories—both of which are passions she’s combined to write cozy mysteries, such as her latest, ASSAULT AND PEPPER, the first in her new Spice Shop series.

“One challenge of starting a new series—and a big part of the fun—is populating the story and getting to know the characters,” she says.

In ASSAULT AND PEPPER, Pepper Reece is the proud new owner of the Spice Shop in Seattle’s famous Pike Place Market, and by Budewitz’s own description, someone who “totally does not mind being the poster child for the cliché, life begins at forty.”

“After thirteen years of marriage, she discovered her police officer husband and the meter maid in a back booth in a posh new restaurant practically plugging each other’s meters,” she says. “She moved out and bought an unfinished loft in a century-old downtown warehouse. Then the law firm where she’d worked imploded in scandal and took her job with it. So naturally, she tossed her office wardrobe, cut her hair, and bought the Spice Shop, a forty-year-old institution that had lost its verve.”
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Ladle to the Grave by Connie Archer

Ladle to the Grave by Connie Archer

By John Clement

LADLE TO THE GRAVE is the fourth installment in the Soup Lover’s Mystery Series by Connie Archer.  The books follow the story of Lucky Jamieson, whose life was turned upside down when her parents met an untimely death in a car crash on an icy road.  Lucky has returned home to the cozy, idyllic town of Snowflake, Vermont, to run her family’s popular soup shop, “By The Spoonful,” but (as is wont to happen in these cozy, idyllic towns) murder is afoot…

The latest book opens in the woods. It’s almost May, and some of Snowflake’s local ladies have organized a celebration to welcome the arrival of spring. But it doesn’t quite go as planned, does it?

Certainly not!  It’s a murder mystery after all. I had a lot of fun imagining this scene and it actually turned out a bit more humorous, I think, than I had originally anticipated (that’s if you ignore the death throes of the local woman.)

New England has a rich and fascinating history, but also a dark one.  At the time I was working on LADLE TO THE GRAVE, I was reading a very well-researched non-fiction work on the Salem Witchcraft trials of 1691-1692. This book was far more chilling than any horror story I could have imagined. So I think a bit of that concurrent reading inspired the pagan scene. Now, I’m not equating paganism with horror, not at all; however, that’s not how the early Puritan colonists would have viewed it.

Growing up in New England I always felt the shadow of its Puritanical past, its history of witchcraft trials, even its Indian massacres. And I’m reminded of Shirley Jackson, a transplanted Californian, who said she was inspired to write The Lottery and other horror stories after her years of living there.  I understood what she meant about the “hauntedness” of that part of the country.  That’s one of the reasons it’s been so enjoyable for me to write a series set in Vermont and to juxtapose the comfort and safety of the village against the sense of danger lurking in the woods.
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Cognac Conspiracies by Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen, Sally Pane (translator)

Cognac Conspiracies by Jean-Pierre Alaux, Noël Balen, Sally PaneThe heirs to one of the oldest Cognac estates in France face a hostile takeover by foreign investors.

Renowned wine expert Benjamin Cooker is called in to audit the books. In what he thought was a sleepy provincial town, he is stonewalled, crosses paths with his first love, and stands up to high-level state officials keen on controlling the buyout.

Meanwhile, irresistible Virgile mingles with the local population until a drowning changes the stakes.

Part of the ongoing Winemaker Detective series.

*****

“The Winemaker Detective mystery series is a new obsession.” —Marienella

“The descriptions of cognac and cigar scents and flavors drew me in as if I, too, were a connoisseur.” —4-star librarian review

“This book and its successors will whet appetites of fans of both Iron Chef and Murder, She Wrote.” —Booklist (on Treachery in Bordeaux)
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Lane Changes by S. L. Ellis

Lane Changes by S. LBy Cathy Perkins

S.L. Ellis’s debut novel hit the streets with attitude! Cassie Cruise wants her life back as a kick-ass P.I. Trouble is, she has zero credibility since bungling a case on reality TV. After a public tantrum, she slinks off to bury her head in the sandy beaches of Southwest Florida.

Just as she starts over as the owner of The Big Prick Tattoo Shop, a body is discovered in the trunk of her burning car. Cassie’s aware there are those who’d get in line for their turn to torch her car. But murder?

You don’t have to like her, but you damn well better respect her. And get out of her way—this is one case she intends to solve, with or without an audience.

Kirkus Reviews called it “A captivating introduction to a cozy female PI series with potential for wide appeal.” Jack Magnus of Readers’ Favorite went further: “Ellis’ hard-boiled detective story, Lane Changes, is a refreshing new take on the private detection genre. Cassie starts working on a mystery . . . she just can’t let go, and it’s a joy to watch her as she digs in with a ‘to hell with the consequences’ attitude. I’m looking forward to reading more stories featuring Cassie Cruise. Lane Changes is good, gutsy and highly recommended.”

S. L. Ellis came from a small-town in Michigan, where life consisted of family and work and too much winter. After a few decades of shoveling and scraping snow, Ellis was ready for a fresh start. A move to Florida and time on the beach improved her disposition a hundred-fold. It’s there that writing became more than a thought. Classes were taken, workshops worked, and a few books written.
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