Latest Books

Nickel City Blues by Gary Earl Ross

Buffalo, New York, private investigator Gideon Rimes, a black Iraq-war vet and retired army CID detective, is hired to protect blues singer Indigo Waters from her ex-boyfriend, a police officer who serves as a driver and personal bodyguard for Buffalo Mayor Ophelia Green. When the boyfriend is murdered, Rimes is the prime suspect. He’s arrested but police are forced to release him due to a lack of evidence. As the cops search for clues to tie Rimes to the murder, he begins his own hunt for the killer, uncovering a plot that involves city leaders, a wealthy business owner, corrupt cops, access to control of a half-billion-dollar project—and a dark family secret that someone will do anything to keep hidden, regardless of who they have to kill…

NICKEL CITY BLUES author, Gary Earl Ross, recently discussed his latest novel with The Big Thrill:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

As a black writer who tries to capture the diverse cultural and social intersections of modern America, I hope readers find NICKEL CITY BLUES engaging and the central characters compelling enough to make them read future Nickel City titles.
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What the Dead Leave Behind by David Housewright

Once a police detective in St. Paul, Minnesota, Rushmore McKenzie has become not only an unlikely millionaire, but an occasional unlicensed private investigator, doing favors for friends and people in need. When his stepdaughter Erica asks him for just such a favor, McKenzie doesn’t have it in him to refuse. Even though it sounds like a very bad idea right from the start.

The father of Malcolm Harris, a college friend of Erica’s, was found murdered a year ago in a park in New Brighton, a town just outside the Twin Cities. With no real clues and all the obvious suspects with concrete alibis, the case has long since gone cold. As McKenzie begins poking around, he soon discovers another unsolved murder that’s tangentially related to this one. And all connections seem to lead back to a group of friends the victim was close with. But all McKenzie has is a series of odd, even suspicious, coincidences until someone decides to make it all that more serious and personal.

Author David Housewright recently sat down with The Big Thrill to discuss his novel, WHAT THE DEAD LEAVE BEHIND:
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The One-Eyed Judge by Michael Ponsor

When FBI agents barge into the home of Sidney Cranmer, accusing him of possession of child pornography, the respected literature professor’s life becomes a nightmare. Cranmer insists the illicit material is not his, but the charge appears airtight, and his academic specialty—the works of suspected pedophile Lewis Carroll, author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland—convinces investigators he is lying.

The Honorable David S. Norcross regrets not recusing himself from this routine criminal case, especially considering that his girlfriend, Claire Lindemann, knows the defendant and is convinced he is innocent. Soon, she will take matters into her own hands. Meanwhile, a family tragedy leaves Norcross responsible for his two young nieces, and a separate investigation identifies a murderous predator still at large. Now Judge Norcross must navigate through a maelstrom of deceit, revenge, and unspeakable evil looming over everyone he loves.

THE ONE-EYED JUDGE author, Michael Ponsor, chatted with The Big Thrill about latest legal thriller:
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Will to Live by Rachel Amphlett

Reputation is everything.

When a packed commuter train runs over a body on a stretch of track known to locals as “Suicide Mile,” it soon transpires that the man was a victim of a calculated murder.

As the investigation evolves and a pattern of murders is uncovered, Detective Sergeant Kay Hunter realizes the railway’s recent reputation may be the work of a brutal serial killer.

With a backlog of cold cases to investigate and while attempting to uncover who is behind a professional vendetta against her, Kay must keep one step ahead of both the killer and her own adversaries.

When a second murder takes place within a week of the first, she realizes the killer’s timetable has changed, and she’s running out of time to stop him.

WILL TO LIVE is the second book in a new crime thriller series featuring Kay Hunter—a detective with a hidden past and an uncertain future.

Author Rachel Amphlett chatted with The Big Thrill to discuss her latest novel, WILL TO LIVE:
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Perish the Day by John Farrow

By Cathy Perkins

John Farrow is the pen name of Trevor Ferguson, a literary legend in his native country of Canada. Writing as John Farrow, he’s the author of the Storm Murders trilogy. PERISH THE DAY is the third in the trilogy, a novel about which Lee Child stated, “The best yet in one of my favorite series —I love Émile Cinq-Mars.”

PERISH THE DAY opens with a co-ed found murdered on campus. Coincidentally (or not), a college custodian is also dead. While an epic rainstorm assails the Holyoake, New Hampshire campus, a third crime scene is revealed: a professor, formerly a spy, is found shot in his home along with a mysterious note warning him to run. Coming up against campus secrets, Émile Cinq-Mars must quickly uncover the links between disparate groups before the next victim is selected for an elaborate initiation into murder.

I caught up with Farrow recently and asked him about the world—and protagonist—of PERISH THE DAY. The lead detective, Émile Cinq-Mars, appeared in two novels prior to the Storm Murder trilogy, one with him toiling in mid-career, and another with him as a young beat cop. In the Storm Murders, Cinq-Mars has retired from the force, although not, as it turns out, from investigating murder. Retirement has offered Cinq-Mars the freewheeling latitude of an amateur sleuth, yet provided the background and contacts of a professional investigator. While he was never a homicide detective—he still solved murders—his continued investigative activity in retirement isn’t a stretch.

A new life stage, however, has brought new challenges. His younger wife wants to change her career, and other questions dog them: Will they move? Will they remain a couple? The weather has also turned adverse. The “storms” of the Storm trilogy harness the atmosphere of the various locales: blizzards in Quebec, Louisiana hurricanes, storms at sea, a mountain tempest in New Hampshire.
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Off the Page: Kate Quinn on a Wartime Story

Creating a Spy

When I first began plotting out THE ALICE NETWORK, I knew my heroine would be a spy. She was going to work for French aristocrat Louise de Bettignies, who under the code name of Alice ran a network of agents in German-occupied France during the First World War. My heroine would be recruited by her, would have harrowing adventures, and would be named Eve—that much I knew right away. Figuring out the rest was a little trickier, because the words “female spy” come pre-loaded with expectations.

Hollywood, James Bond, and the film noir tradition have given us plenty of preconceptions about female spies. Sleek assassins with stiletto knives in their stiletto boots, sexy hackers with thumb drives full of nuclear codes in their bras, sultry femme fatales seducing state secrets out of oblivious men over champagne and pillow talk—say “female spy” and the resulting image is flamboyant, glamorous, and above all sexy. But the realities of spying weren’t so picturesque—and a woman who succeeded as a spy in real life would be very different from your average James Bond espionage queen hiking her couture evening gown out of the way so she can snap a man’s neck with her thighs.

The Alice network’s agents relied more on stealth and observation than glamour or secret-agent skills. Louise de Bettignies’ sources were ordinary men and women who observed the German invaders, eavesdropped on them, rifled their paperwork, and secretly passed any information gained back to British intelligence. Getting German attention was dangerous; it was far better for your spying and your health if they didn’t notice you at all—to this end, women and teenagers were often recruited, since they were less likely to be suspected. And a successful spy probably wasn’t swanning around a fancy party in a glittering gown, the center of all eyes—she was far better off serving the canapes, storing away every tidbit of information in earshot while going completely unobserved.
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The Brass Compass by Ellen Butler

A beautiful American spy flees into the night. On her own, she must live by her wits to evade capture and make it to the safety of the Allied forces.

Lily Saint James grew up traveling the European continent, learning languages as she went. In 1938, her mother’s abrupt death brings her back home to Washington, D.C., and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Lily comes to the attention of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). Her knowledge of German, French, and Italian makes her the perfect OSS Agent, and her quick thinking places her as a nanny in the household of an important German Army Colonel, where she is able to gather intelligence for the Allies. After her marketplace contact goes missing, she makes a late-night trip to her secondary contact only to find him under interrogation by the SS. When he commits suicide, she flees into the frigid winter night carrying false identification papers that are now dangerous and a mini film cartridge with vital strategic information. In order to survive, Lily must make it out of Germany, into the hands of Allied-controlled France, through a path fraught with peril.

The Big Thrill caught up with author, Ellen Butler, to discuss her novel, THE BRASS COMPASS:
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Honor Among Thieves by Wayne Zurl

Cops run into all kinds of characters on the job. But when Chief Sam Jenkins meets four people from his former life as a New York detective, it throws him for a loop.

The first was a low level gangster named Carlo “Carly Nickels” DeCenzo—lying on a slab in the Blount County morgue with Sam’s name and phone number written on a scrap of paper in his pocket.

Next there’s Gino Musucci, infamous Northeast crime boss who says he wants to retire and relocate—to Sam’s town of Prospect, Tennessee.

And there’s Dixie Foster, Sam’s former secretary and the woman who wanted to steal him away from his wife. Sam wonders why she’s turned up after eighteen years.

With DeCenzo’s murder unsolved, another body shows up in a Prospect motel—that of a retired detective and co-worker from Sam’s past.

When Sam receives a letter from an old mobster who warns him about a contract on his life, he wonders: Is this any way for a cop to spend his time on the “peaceful side of the Smokies?”
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Hunts Point by Uriel E. Gribetz

By Renee James

Uriel E. Gribetz was born and raised in the Bronx, New York, and served nearly thirty years in the public defender’s office in that borough. He took up creative writing at the age of eighteen, at the Bennington Writers Workshop, and has published short stories and essays, along with two novels. His first novel, Taconic Murda, was released in 2014.

HUNTS POINT, Gribetz’s new release, was actually the first book he worked on. Set in his beloved Bronx, the story revolves around a damaged hero named Sam Free who seeks justice for the weak, this time a young man called Jonah who is wrongfully convicted of a grisly murder. HUNTS POINT was released this April by Perfect Crime Books. The Big Thrill interviewed Gribetz about the novel.

Your latest publication centers on a wrongful conviction. Tell us about the young man, and how your life as a public defender helped you create this character.

Sometimes things happen to people that they have no control over and these events shape their lives.  Recently I had a seven-year-old client whose mother’s boyfriend murdered his mother and his siblings. The client was stabbed fifteen times, but he survived. How do you get past something like that? I see horrible, awful things that happen to people, yet they are able to survive and go forward.

In the book, Jonah, as a child, was nearly murdered by the Super’s helper in his building. That event shaped him. Jonah’s story is his quest to no longer be a victim of his circumstances. In fact, when Sam Free visits Jonah in prison, Jonah tells Sam that he refuses to be a victim anymore.  The strength and resiliency of the human spirit is truly amazing, and I try to capture that with Jonah.
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Incognito by Khaled Talib

By Tom O’Brien

Khaled Talib is a former international journalist. In his new thriller, INCOGNITO, he takes us on an international journey to find a kidnapped pope.

Any interesting stories about your research for INCOGNITO? How many popes did you have to kidnap to get it right?

From what I’ve read about popes through the centuries, several have suffered violent ends. In the initial phase, I thought of writing a murder mystery. It would’ve been easier to kill the pope. Then I started to get more ambitious. I decided to take him alive. My editor told me it’s impossible because the Pope’s security is tight. So I showed him how it could be done. I actually created a step-by-step plan. My editor then agreed with my theory. It’s not an idea I plucked from the air, but something I while researching the Pope’s movements. So I began writing the story. I think it sounds believable.

They say truth is stranger than fiction. As a former journalist, would you agree?

Yes, I totally agree. Of course, if you tell me vampires exist, I’ll laugh out loud. But there are some things that we can’t deny. We have all witnessed miracles and things happening that are out of the ordinary. Common knowledge says if a man falls off a building, he dies. Yet we have seen how some have survived. In some cases, they get up and walk away. How did that happen?
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Two Heads Are Deader Than One by Elena Hartwell

By Terri Nolan

Elena Hartwell is a novelist, a playwright, and a teacher. A renaissance woman. Her recent novel, TWO HEADS ARE DEADER THAN ONE, features private investigator Eddie Shoes, and is the second in the series.

Hartwell says if Kinsey Millhone and James Rockford had a love child, it would be Eddie Shoes. As homage to the noir private detective, Hartwell has taken that classic character—the hard bitten, loner, male PI—and, first, turned him into a woman who’s not so much hard bitten as she is practical and logical, and, second, not so much a loner as she is a person who was once on her own and now finds herself surrounded by friends and family. Eddie is a new classic.

TWO HEADS ARE DEADER THAN ONE begins with a plea for bail money from Eddie’s high school friend. Eddie’s decision to free her friend sets the stage for more trouble than she imagined. Humor brackets the serious aspects of the human experience explored in the novel. Readers will be thrilled and amused at the same time.

Introduce us to your protagonist. How was she “born”?

My protagonist was born on a road trip. My husband and I were driving across Washington State and for some reason he made up the name Eddie Shoes. I thought that’s a perfect name for a female private eye. I started to think about what this character would be like. What kind of person would be named Eddie Shoes? I realized she would be quirky and a little irreverent and not take life too seriously. She would also be independent and a bit suspicious of people. So that’s where I started with her.
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Shadow Man by Alan Drew

Southern California, 1986. Detective Ben Wade has returned to his California home town of Rancho Santa Elena for a quieter life. Suddenly, the town, with its peaceful streets and excellent public schools, finds itself at the mercy of a serial killer who slips through windows and screen doors, shattering illusions of safety. As Ben and forensic specialist Natasha Betencourt struggle to stay one step ahead of the killer, Ben’s own world is rocked again by a teen’s suicide. Ben must decide how far he is willing to go, and how much he will risk, to rescue the town from a long buried secret, as well as from a psychotic murderer. Shadow man brings us into the treacherous underbelly of a suburban California town, and a community confronted with the heart of human darkness.

Author Alan Drew was kind enough to spend some time with The Big Thrill discussing his latest novel, SHADOW MAN:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

The serial killer in the novel is loosely based on Richard Ramirez, The Night Stalker, who terrorized Southern California the summer of 1985. While this book is a thriller, it is also an investigation of a place. The book is set in master-planned Rancho Santa Elena, a community that feels insulated from the crimes that happen in other towns. There’s another crime in this book, a more subtle and in some ways more devastating one, that complicates the narrative—it also complicates the life of detective Benjamin Wade as he goes deeper into the investigation of it. A crime that is caused by something dark within Rancho Santa Elena that suggests that the things we should fear the most are not outside, hiding in the dark, but are perhaps much closer to home.
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The Suffering Tree by Elle Cosimano

Tori Burns and her family left D.C. for claustrophobic Chaptico, Maryland, after suddenly inheriting a house under mysterious circumstances. That inheritance puts her at odds with the entire town, especially Jesse Slaughter and his family-it’s their generations-old land the Burns have “stolen.” But none of that seems to matter after Tori witnesses a young man claw his way out of a grave under the gnarled oak in her new backyard.

Nathaniel Bishop may not understand what brought him back, but it’s clear to Tori that he hates the Slaughters for what they did to him centuries ago. Wary yet drawn to him by a shared sense of loss, she gives him shelter. But in the wake of his arrival comes a string of troubling events-including the disappearance of Jesse Slaughter’s cousin-that seem to point back to Nathaniel.

As Tori digs for the truth-and slowly begins to fall for Nathaniel-she uncovers something much darker in the tangled branches of the Slaughter family tree. In order to break the curse that binds Nathaniel there and discover the true nature of her inheritance, Tori must unravel the Slaughter family’s oldest and most guarded secrets. But the Slaughters want to keep them buried at any cost.

From award-winning author Elle Cosimano comes a haunting, atmospheric thriller perfect to hand to readers of the Mara Dyer trilogy and Bone Gap.
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A Deeper Grave by Debra Webb

By Wendy Tyson

A DEEPER GRAVE is USA Today bestselling author Debra Webb’s third novel in the popular Shades of Death series. In this latest installment, Montgomery detective Bobbie Gentry joins forces with serial killer Nick Shade to pursue a copycat murderer.

Webb writes thrillers, romantic suspense, mysteries, and romance, and she’s the recipient of a number of awards, including the prestigious Romantic Times Career Achievement Award for Romantic Suspense. I recently had the pleasure of talking with Webb about A DEEPER GRAVE, thriller-writing, and her inspiring journey to publication.

Congratulations on the upcoming release of A DEEPER GRAVE! No spoilers, but what can you tell us about your book that we won’t find in the jacket copy or the PR material? 

Detective Gentry’s story of survival and determination to keep being a cop is based a bit on my recovery and determination to continue writing after a serious accident.
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The Weight of Night by Christine Carbo

By George Ebey

In her book THE WEIGHT OF NIGHT, Christine Carbo brings us the latest installment in her Glacier Mystery Series.

As a devastating fire rips through the magnificent and brutal terrain of Glacier National Park, a shallow grave containing human remains is found. At the same time, a teenager suddenly goes missing from one of the campgrounds. Could the two cases be connected? Park Police Officer Monty Harris and crime scene investigator Gretchen Larson are determined to find out, no matter what dangers lie ahead.

The Big Thrill checked in with Christine to learn more.

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

This is the third in a series called Glacier Mystery Series: however, each book stands alone, similar to Tana French’s Dublin Murder Mystery Series. Because each book stands alone, I try to play out the complete arch of the main character(s). And in that process, I try to shoot for something that ends up transcending the central mystery. Therefore, I hope that readers will feel that THE WEIGHT OF NIGHT is more than a mystery to be solved, and that it’s also a novel of friendship, survival and redemption set against a stark and stunning landscape
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The Fallen by Eric Van Lustbader

By Austin S. Camacho

In his latest novel, Eric van Lustbader turns away from the secret agent action of the Jason Bourne series to deliver a pulse-pounding thriller featuring even more powerful and deadly villains in THE FALLEN.

In this novel the End of Days is upon us. In a hidden cave in Lebanon, a man discovers a forbidden tome that turns out to be the Testament of Lucifer. Now The Fallen–Lucifer’s advance guard–have arisen and Bravo Shaw, head of the Gnostic Observatine sect, must face the threat. The Gnostic Observatines, a lay religious order founded in the 15th Century, are just part of the long, unique history of the Bravo family. Like his sister Emma, Bravo Shaw is not quite like you and me.

“You’d be fascinated by his encyclopedic knowledge of ancient history, languages, peoples, and the occult arts,” Lustbader says. “And he’s very driven, highly focused on his responsibilities. As the head of the Gnostic Observatines, he has a great deal on his plate, especially with the advent of the final battle to enslave mankind and breach the gates of heaven.”
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One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus

The Breakfast Club meets Pretty Little Liars, ONE OF US IS LYING is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive.

Seventeen-year-old Simon Kelleher is the creator of Bayview High’s notorious gossip app. On Friday, he planned to post juicy reveals about four high-profile students. On Thursday, he died in front of them.

When police learn Simon’s death wasn’t an accident, everyone is a suspect. Are they guilty? Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?

The Big Thrill caught up with author Karen M. McManus to discuss her debut young adult thriller, ONE OF US IS LYING:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

That people aren’t always what they seem on the surface—and this is true for how people see themselves, too. Sometimes it takes a shocking incident to jar you out of complacency and the ease of following a path that’s been set for you. Each of the main characters in ONE OF US IS LYING have a lot to lose when their secrets are revealed, but they also have a chance to grow and become more layered and accepting of themselves and others.
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Yeti Unleashed by Richard Edde

Dr. Harry Olson, an American paleoanthropologist, and his wife, Dixie, have returned from the mountains of Mongolia with two live Yeti, a male and a female. A team of scientists in Harry’s anthropology department at California Pacific University are now trying to uncover a link between human and Yeti genetics. But when the Yeti escape, Harry’s in a race against time to recapture the animals, knowing only too well how the terrible consequences will be if the creatures make it off the desolate high-desert facility and reach a human city.

Richard Edde, author of YETI UNLEASHED, spent some time with The Big Thrill discussing his latest novel:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

Although a work of fiction, my Yeti series demonstrates that it is entirely possible that we have unearthed all of our human ancestors and cousins. What we may yet discover may entirely amaze and frighten us.
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Resurrection Mall by Dana King

By Karen Harper

I learned a lot interviewing Dana King, since he writes books that are more hard boiled than mine, but I also learned we have a lot in common.  We are both drawn to small town settings where the enemy is often us—someone we know—and life is definitely not glitz and glamor. His unique career background has prepared him well for writing both long and short fiction.

Read on to learn more about his new thriller, RESURRECTION MALL.

Please tell us what your book is about. 

RESURRECTION MALL is the story of a town fallen on hard times. Various solutions promise grand results, but the profits always go to a select few pockets. There seems to be no downside to a televangelist’s efforts to rebuild an abandoned shopping center into a mall that caters to religious-themed businesses, with his new church and TV studio serving as the anchors. The problem is that low-profit enterprises not only have trouble raising seed money, they often can’t afford to do the research needed to fully understand why no one else has found a good use for this location. The book is about what happens when an event totally unrelated to the mall’s construction might bring down the entire project.

Is the setting of Penns River based on a place you know or, if not, how does it work well for your story?

I grew up in Penns River. Well, the three small towns near Pittsburgh that make up my Penns River. I was struck one day about how big cities have always been well represented in crime fiction, and now writers like Daniel Woodrell are giving voice to more rural areas, but I couldn’t think of anyone writing about the problems of the towns that bridge the two, and what happens when industry leaves and never comes back to a place that lacks the population density to attract new businesses. Pittsburgh reinvented itself as a center for medicine, education, and finance, but that prosperity never seems to make it up the Allegheny River.

You have a varied career background as musician, school teacher, and systems analyst. Have any of these pursuits contributed to your writing?

Teaching has to some extent. I taught in a high school close to the border between Washington, DC and Hyattsville, MD that was 80 per cent minority. I grew up in a working class small town that had no more than half a dozen black kids out of 900 in my high school. Teaching those couple of years developed my sense of empathy, and showed how similar most people are despite superficial differences. It’s been a great help with my characters.

More than that, though, is the musical background. Besides exposing me to things and people I never would have been aware of, it developed my ear. Not only is that essential for good dialogue, but it allows me to know if I’m capturing the voice I’m looking for. There are times when I’ll replace a word the dictionary says would be more appropriate because the one I chose sounds better.

Your excellent reviews and websites describe your work as mystery and thriller.  Do these two terms fit only certain of your novels, or are these book genres reflected in each of your books, especially RESURRECTION MALL? 

I can’t say there’s a lot of mystery in my books. Even in my private eye novels, where the reader learns the clues as Nick Forte discovers them, Forte often solves the mystery well before the end of the book. After that it’s a matter of finding out what he’s going to do about it.

RESURRECTION MALL has a similar element. The cops have a pretty good idea who they’re looking for less than halfway through the book. The suspense lies in seeing what they can do about it, and how timely they’ll be.

There are certainly elements of noir in RESURRECTION MALL—I doubt anyone would describe the ending as happy—but I don’t really think of myself as a noir writer. I know people who disagree, so I could be wrong. To me, true noir has a bad outcome for the protagonist. Most of my stuff has a bittersweet ending for the main character, so I think of it as noir-ish. (Or gris, as my Francophile daughter and I decided one day.) My writing style is clipped and hard-boiled, which lends itself to noir, which may be what some are picking up on.

Speaking of the fascinating concept of a “religious themed mall,” did a particular place inspire that idea?  I’m thinking of Kentucky’s Creation Museum or the Holyland Experience outside Orlando.

I first got the idea to “resurrect” a mall when I lived near Chicago and occasionally drove past the abandoned Dixie Square Mall in Harvey, IL, where they filmed the great chase scene in The Blues Brothers. The idea of something left for dead like that combined with the evangelical Christian concept of being born again, then placing the entire operation in an impoverished location, appealed to me.

As well as novels (including a Shamus Award), you have also written highly-praised short fiction.  Do you prefer one format or the other?  What (other than writing time) are the pros and cons for you of these different forms?

Sorry to disagree, but I have to set the record straight: I haven’t won any Shamuses. I have been nominated twice, each of which was a great thrill. I believe that P.I. fiction done well is the highest form of crime writing, so to have a group like the Private Eye Writers of America think that highly of my work is beyond flattering.

To your question, short stories are much harder for me. They’re in an area between writing a flash piece—which I enjoy—and a novel, which I love. The problem with short stories is that if I like a mix of idea, characters, and location enough to write five thousand words, my mind naturally keeps thinking of what happens next and pretty soon I’m outlining a novel. That’s not a problem for a flash piece, because of the natural limitations in scope of a story of fewer than a thousand words.

I find myself needing to write more short stories of late, and I have to confess, about half of them are either flash pieces that lent themselves well to expansion, or bits excised from novels that stand alone well. Even then I write on the short side for almost all my stories, around 1,500 to 2,000 words, or about the length of an average chapter in one of my novels.

You are also adept at writing a series, something I find more challenging than single title books. Are continuing characters a challenge for you or a boon, as in your Nick Forte series?

A boon, absolutely. No question. I constantly find myself watching TV or a movie and wondering, “What would Nick do here? What would Doc do?” It even happens when I’m out places. Say I’m meeting someone in a deli and I’m there first. (Which I almost always am. I’m pathologically punctual.) If I forgot to bring a book I’ll kill the time casing the joint, trying to look at it as one of my characters might.

I enjoy being in the characters’ worlds so much I crossed the two series over and brought Nick Forte to Penns River as a “guest star” in Grind Joint. I had a need for a character just like him and decided he was actually first cousins with Ben Dougherty and grew up in Penns River. It was great fun to write him in the third person to show how other people viewed him.

You have a great blog on how well the classic TV series NYPD Blue holds up over timeWhy does that series still work for you, even though, as you say, the police methods are dated?  Any current “cop shows” that pass your muster?

NYPD Blue holds up so well for three critical reasons. As I said in the blog, the execution is almost flawless. That goes a long way toward carrying off anything else that might show a little age.

Second is the situations the characters find themselves in. The show is largely about cops’ perspectives on interpersonal dynamics that have been true probably since before language developed. This is why shows like The Honeymooners and All in the Family are still popular. They’re about people, and people as a species don’t change that much.

From the cop angle the show continues to work because, for all the cool CSI stuff we see now, cases are still broken using much the same techniques cops use on the show: paying attention and talking to people. Fibers and DNA may seal a conviction, but someone has to catch the bad guy first. One of my proudest moments as a writer came on a Bouchercon panel a couple of years ago when Jim Born, a retired cop and that day’s moderator, inserted a comment when I gave that answer to a question, saying, “Listen to that. He’s absolutely right.” Made my day.

As for current cop shows, I have to confess that I don’t watch any. That’s not to rip them. I just don’t have time. The little bit of television I watch is spent on things that have already passed muster, either revisiting favorites of mine (The Wire, The Shield, Justified) or something else that people I trust keep telling me I really, really, really, need to see. Which is how I came to “discover” NYPD Blue a mere 22 years after it first aired.

As a busy writer, can you give other authors advice on how to balance writing time with “real life?”  Any hints of getting the words on the page?

I can, but it probably won’t help. It’s a matter of butt in seat, fingers on keys. Some days are better than others, but get something done every day, even if it stinks. That’s what rewriting is for. I do five or six drafts of each book, so bad days don’t concern me that much. My idea is I won’t have bad days every time I work this section. Over time I’ll get it where I want it.

I also have two advantages a lot of writers don’t. I’m a classically trained musician and played professionally well into my thirties. Musicians are used to spending hours a day locked in small rooms practicing. The primary difference is that writing is creative and playing music is interpretive. Both activities cut you off from outside contact, so you need to be comfortable with it.

The other advantage I had, and have, is that by the time I got serious about writing I had no small children around the house. That’s not a rap on children. If my daughter were little and around when I started out as a writer, damn right I’d spend the time with her. Kids are always more important. I’ll never criticize those who can’t find time to write because they’re doing things with their kids. My luxury has been in never having to choose.

*****

Dana King has two Shamus Award nominations, for A Small Sacrifice and The Man in the Window. His Penns River series of police procedurals includes Worst Enemies and Grind Joint, which Woody Haut, writing for the L.A. Review of Books, cited as one of the fifteen best noir reads of 2013. A short story, “Green Gables,” appeared in the anthology Blood, Guts, and Whiskey, edited by Todd Robinson. Other short fiction has appeared in Spinetingler, New Mystery Reader, A Twist of Noir, Mysterical-E, and Powder Burn Flash.

To learn more about Dana, please visit his blog, One Bite at a Time. He lives in quiet near seclusion with The Beloved Spouse.

 
 

A Negro and an Ofay by Danny Gardner

By G. Robert Frazier

Danny Gardner first made a name for himself as a stand-up comedian on HBO’s Def Comedy Jam. So, what’s he doing scribing dark, gritty tales of crime in 1950s Chicago? Turns out the author of A NEGRO AND AN OFAY has also toiled in scriptwriting, acting, and directing—a real Renaissance Man of the literary arts.

When you take them separately, it seems like a lot,” he says. “But be it stand-up, or screenwriting, or acting, it all comes from my deep, spiritual love for words. First, comedy and acting gave me a career and, eventually, a small place in pop-culture. Now that I’m a published novelist, it’s the ultimate expression of that love. I’m always going to write, be it the next Elliot Caprice novel, or just doing improv on stage for ten minutes. That’s who I am. That’s how I love myself the most.”

In addition to his comedy bits, Gardner is a frequent reader at “Noir at the Bar” events nationwide, and blogs regularly at 7 Criminal Minds.

Fortunately, the transition from the stage to the keyboard wasn’t hard.

“Once I gave myself a chance, I realized my talent was suited for long-form writing,” Gardner says. “I’ve found the proper outlet for my creative desires. I could finally stop cramming all the world building and multiple points of view into screenplays and comedy bits.”

In this interview with The Big Thrill, Gardner shares details about A NEGRO AND AN OFAY, its genesis, and his story of success.
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Crossed Bones by S. W. Lauden

Shayna Billups left Tommy Ruzzo and Seatown, Florida in smoking ruins before escaping to New Orleans. She’s slinging rum drinks at a pirate-themed dive bar when a treasure map grabs her attention. All alone and thirsting for adventure, Shayna follows the clues to North Carolina where she assembles a band of drug-dealing pirates to wage war on a murderous mayor and his blood-thirsty biker gang.

As the bodies pile up, Shayna wonders if Ruzzo will find her before she ends up in Davy Jones’ Locker.

Author S. W. Lauden recently took some time to discuss CROSSED BONES with The Big Thrill:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

I’ve heard it said that “love can make people do crazy things.” I’ve also been told that “life will take you funny places if you let it.” This book tests Tommy Ruzzo’s devotion to Shayna Billups, and the results are a bloody mess.
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Falling Darkness by Karen Harper

By Wendy Tyson

We met forensic psychologist Claire Britten in Chasing Shadows, Karen Harper’s South Shore Series debut. Claire returns in FALLING DARKNESS, Harper’s third novel in the series. Once again the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author takes readers on a thrilling ride. With a twisting plot, compelling characters, unrelenting suspense, and a rich setting, readers won’t be able to put FALLING DARKNESS down.

I recently spoke with Harper about FALLING DARKNESS, her fascinating writing career, and her tips for maximizing suspense in crime fiction.

Please tell us what FALLING DARKNESS is about.

Claire, her husband Nick and her daughter Lexi are fleeing by plane from a criminal mastermind out to stop them from exposing him to the FBI. But their plane is sabotaged and plunges into shark infested waters near Cuba—and that’s just the start of their attempt to hide out until their enemy can be caught.  The WITSEC program plans to hide them in northern Michigan for the winter, but they have to find a way to get there first—and survive.
more »

 
 

The Age of Olympus by Gavin Scott

In 1946 Archeologist and former SOE operative Duncan Forrester returns to his wartime haunts in Greece to retrieve an inscription which may be the key to Minoan civilisation. But Greece is on the verge of civil war, and when a Greek poet is murdered, Forrester finds himself in the middle of a clash between communism and democracy, on a mysterious Aegean island haunted by a mythical past.

THE AGE OF OLYMPUS author, Gavin Scott, recently spent some time with The Big Thrill discussing his novel:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

I hope readers will take away not just the satisfaction of a mystery solved, but the feeling that they’ve actually spent time in the Greece and Crete of 1946 and magical Aegean islands in the era before mass tourism, exploring Crusader Castles and ruined temples and hidden coves where the ghosts of ancient gods still linger.
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The Secret Room by Sandra Block

By Charlie Cochrane

If anyone tells you that authors are all alike, you have my permission to tear them off a strip. The members of ITW are a marvelously diverse group and Sandra Block illustrates that perfectly, being a practicing neurologist, with a wide range of genre strings to her authorial bow.

Sandra, writing poetry, fiction and medical articles are skills as unalike as chalk, cheese and chopsticks! What challenges did you find?

You’re right, they are quite different! I’ve always written both fiction and poetry, but through college, poetry was my true passion. I found working on rhythms and structure a joyful challenge. But after medical school, the desire just kind of dried up. I suspect having kids took its toll – I just didn’t have the time or mental energy for both. So I stuck with fiction. As for medical journals…alas, research writing is a skill I never mastered.

I fell in love with Arthur the minute he appeared on the page. They say never work with animals or children, but does the same apply to writing about them?

Arthur happens to be modeled after my own goofy and adorable dog, so it doesn’t surprise me that everyone loves him.
more »

 
 

The Forever Spy by Jeffrey Layton

By Sonja Stone 

 

The FOREVER SPY, sequel to The Good Spy, finds former Russian naval intelligence officer Yuri Kirov quietly living as a civilian with lover and ally Laura Newman. Yuri is pulled back into the world of espionage and political warfare when he’s pressed to help the United States contain a massive environmental crisis. When his presence is discovered by a turncoat spy, Yuri unwittingly finds himself part of a deadly scheme to spark the next World War. 

 

Jeffrey Layton talked with The Big Thrill about his recent release, writing, and the world of Russian espionage. 

 

THE FOREVER SPY, your second Yuri Kirov thriller, picks up a year after the events of The Good Spy. What’s life like for Yuri and Laura these days? Did you discover anything new or unexpected about your characters as the sequel unfolded? 

 

Yuri Kirov is a Russian naval intelligence officer hiding in plain sight in the United States after a botched espionage operation (in The Good Spy). He is disillusioned with the Russian government because it abandoned him and others after the spy mission failed. Yuri’s government believes he is dead so no one from Russia is looking for him. 

more »

 
 

Murder Between the Lines by Radha Vatsal

By E.M. Powell

For many writers, the excitement of being a published debut novelist is quickly followed by the enormous challenge of the second novel. Some really struggle with writing a second book or sequel in a series, particularly when that debut has been successful, which Radha Vatsal’s historical mystery,  A Front Page Affair, most definitely was. Yet for Vatsal, writing her new Kitty Weeks novel, MURDER BETWEEN THE LINES, was easier then book one.

“Being a debut author is fun but also scary,” she says. “There’s a steep learning curve.  Everything you’re doing, it’s for the first time.  For me nerves were baked right in to the experience.’ When it came to writing the second book, those anxieties had lessened.  “It was very freeing and I felt like it flowed easily compared to the first one.”

And flow it does. Vatsal’s young female journalist protagonist Kitty Weeks returns in this pacey, cleverly-plotted story set in New York in 1915-16. Kitty, who works for the New York Sentinel Ladies’ Page is tasked with writing a piece about Westfield Hall, a prestigious girls’ boarding school. Kitty expects to find an orderly establishment teaching the safe, standard fare for schoolgirls in 1915, such as French and dancing. But she’s surprised and intrigued to see the work of students like Elspeth Bright, the daughter of a scientist heavily involved in naval technology, who has inherited her father’s interest and talent for scientific inquiry.

A terrible tragedy strikes soon after their meeting when Elspeth is found frozen to death in Central Park. The doctors proclaim that the girl’s sleepwalking was the cause, but Kitty isn’t convinced. Determined to uncover the truth, the intrepid Kitty’s investigations involve her in a dangerous scenario—a murder that may involve Elspeth’s scientist father and a new invention by Thomas Edison. As with Kitty’s first outing, there are plenty of plot twists and turns to keep the reader guessing right to the conclusion.
more »

 
 

The Measure of the Moon by Lisa Preston

By Jaden Terrell

Lisa Preston is no stranger to adventure. She’s been mountain climbing in Alaska, Ecuador, Chile, and Argentina. She’s travelled alone through Europe and Asia. She’s worked as a paramedic and a patrol officer. As a police detective, she worked in the Vice unit, in Crimes Against Children, as a Hostage Negotiator, and as a supervisor in Internal Affairs. Throughout her career in emergency services and law enforcement, she was building memories, many of them sad, all of which laid the foundation for her current career as a novelist.

Of her journey toward publication, she says, “Being a reader set me on the path to writing. I wanted to create absorbing fiction. It took years and more than a million words before my uber agent signed me and made things happen.”

Her latest book, THE MEASURE OF THE MOON, deals with childhood post-traumatic stress disorder. Asked what role her work in the Crimes Against Children unit played in the development of the story, she says, “Oh, my, it’s there. Whatever someone unfamiliar to the investigative specialty of CACU might imagine—it’s tougher and more heartbreaking. The failures are haunting. The audio, video and direct experience I’ve seen and heard cannot be undone. There are people in this world who do very bad things to the most vulnerable victims.
more »

 
 

Greed Can Kill by Bob Doerr

This Jim West mystery/thriller, the seventh in the series, finds Jim traveling to Fabens, TX, in an effort to locate an old acquaintance who had written Jim a cryptic letter asking for his help in finding a briefcase. In Fabens, he discovers that someone has murdered his friend. Jim provides a copy of the letter to the local police explaining that he has no idea where the briefcase is or how to decipher the sets of numbers provided in the letter. Figuring there is nothing more he can do, Jim starts his trek home. He plans to spend a night or two relaxing at the Lodge in Cloudcroft, NM, on his way, only to find that he is being followed. An ominous, unidentified phone caller gives Jim an order—find the briefcase and turn it over to him within a week. A violent confrontation in Cloudcroft verifies Jim’s worst suspicion, a Mexican drug cartel wants the briefcase. The confrontation also brings the FBI into the picture. They also want Jim to continue his search. The search takes Jim to the New Mexican ghost town of Chloride where the final confrontation takes place and Jim finds out who the bad guys really are.

Author Bob Doerr spent some time discussing his latest novel, GREED CAN KILL, with The Big Thrill:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

I hope readers find that this book tells an interesting and fun to read story. They should find the use of Fabens, Texas, Cloudcroft, NM, Truth or Consequences, NM, and the ghost town of Chloride, NM, as seldom used but fascinating settings for a mystery. Finally, I hope readers take away a hunger to read other Jim West books they may not have already read.
more »

 
 

Flamingo Road by Sasscer Hill

Baltimore police officer Fia Mckee is suspended for excessive use of force. Given a second chance, she’s sent to work undercover for the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau (TRPB) at Gulfstream Park in Florida, where her assignment is to spy on two racetrack workers suspected of illegal activities and whose horses continue to outperform all expectations.

To complete her cover story, Fia moves in with her semi-estranged brother, Patrick, and his daughter, Jilly. Fia’s investigations become twofold when Jilly disappears after an off the grid Cuban gang steals her beloved pony for horse meat. Along the way, Fia encounters, a (very handsome) do-gooder who’s close on their trail, and a cabal of super wealthy gamblers who will stop at nothing to ensure they always win.

The Big Thrill caught up with Sasscer Hill to discuss her latest novel, FLAMINGO ROAD:
more »

 
 

The Darkest Night by Rick Reed

IT TAKES A COP LIKE JACK MURPHY TO FIND JUSTICE . . .

Jack Murphy knows a setup when he sees one. Proving it makes his day. Especially when it involves his own partner. Lured into a trap, Evansville P.D. Detective Liddell Blanchard is accused of murdering a cop who was investigating a shadowy voodoo cult. Justice is murky enough in the swamplands of Louisiana, but when a purported descendent of Marie Leveaux menaces a murder investigation, the gumbo really hits the fan. Corruption comes with the territory. But there are darker forces at play—and only Murphy can see the light.

Author Rick Reed spent some time with The Big Thrill discussing his latest novel, THE DARKEST NIGHT:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

There is a connection between police partners that equal that of a marriage. My series explores the bounds of those connections and lets the reader decide for themselves just how they would react and how far they would go to protect their partner or loved ones. Readers of my books enjoy the camaraderie of my usual characters—Jack Murphy, Liddell Blanchard (aka/Bigfoot), Deputy Chief Richard Dick (Double Dick), and Little Casket (coroner), to name a few.

THE DARKEST NIGHT is my attempt to develop Liddell Blanchard to allow readers to have a glimpse into his past (and what lies in store for him).
more »

 
 

Dead of Spring by Sherry Knowlton

By Cathy Perkins

Sherry Knowlton, author of the Alexa Williams suspense novels, was born and raised in small-town Pennsylvania, where she developed a lifelong passion for books. Like so many authors, she was the kid who snuck a flashlight to bed at night so she could read beneath the covers.

Knowlton’s interest in the written word never faded. Her novels focus on contemporary issues and DEAD OF SPRING, her new release, is no exception. An environmental crisis is at the heart of this latest story, which deals with fracking and government corruption.  As the current crisis unravels, a parallel historical story tracks the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear incident.

In researching her novel, Knowlton drew on her personal experience living in Pennsylvania during the Three Mile Island episode. Written material on the Internet, state regulations, news clips, and interviews of experts provided additional background material. Knowlton said, “One of my most useful bits of research came when I visited a landowner in northern Pennsylvania who had leased his land to an energy company for fracking.  He leased in the early days of fracking in Pennsylvania and was unaware of the problems he might encounter.”  This man shared his experience, showing the process that transformed his property from a beautiful woodland into an acre of gravel and machinery.  Pristine drinking water now requires constant filtering for showers and bathing, and his life is a constant battle with the energy company for compensation.
more »

 
 

Red Moon Rising by J. T. Brannan

By Dan Levy

Except for a brief stint when he wanted to become a real-life Indiana Jones, J. T. Brannan knew he was going to be a writer early in life. Though a whip and fedora have never been required equipment for Brannan’s varied careers, his resume paints a picture of someone who is predisposed to that level of adventure. It’s hard to believe that someone who is a former national karate champion and nightclub bouncer, and who now serves as a martial arts instructor and member of the British Army Reserves, has the temperament to sit down and write fourteen novels.

But he does, and did. For his fifteenth publication, RED MOON RISING, ITW wanted to learn more.

What started you writing and what keeps your writing today?

I’ve wanted to write for a living since I was about six years old. The motivation is still the same: it is an outlet for my imagination, influenced by a steady diet of books.
more »

 
 

Damn Near Broke by Gary Alexander

By Tom O’Brien

Buddy and Martha Whitacre, a blue-collar couple, celebrate early retirement with a trip to Spain. They return home to discover that they’ve been wiped out by the investment fund that made retirement and travel possible. DAMN NEAR BROKE is the tale of how they deal with impending poverty, each other, and especially the shame of it all.

Seniors fleeced by a phony investment scheme, why did you choose this story line?

Since I’m far too young to be an AARP member, I steal the monthly magazine out of a neighbor’s mailbox. Nearly every issue has horror stories of people who’ve fallen victim to a variety of scams and articles warning of new twists in impoverishing seniors.

You’ve labeled this as a cautionary tale, rightfully so. Is this based on a true story or did it almost hit anyone close to home?

Fortunately, I’ve experienced nothing of this sort up close and personal.
more »

 
 

South California Purples by Baron R. Birtcher

The year is 1973, and the last of America’s soldiers are returning home from Vietnam, often shouted down and spat upon by protesters, while the first toxic cracks of mistrust have begun to appear at the highest levels of government. The American Indian Movement has entered into a bloody occupation of Wounded Knee, gas shortages have pushed the economy into deep recession, and violent civil unrest is captured in living color and broadcast nightly on the evening news. But rural Meriwether County, tucked away amid the sweeping river valleys and serrated mountain ridges of southern Oregon, has been left largely untouched by time. Until now. South California Purples is part contemporary western, and neo-noir, a novel of loyalty, passion and murder, crafted with lyrical prose and unforgettable dialogue that weaves together the sometimes poignant, often violent, strains of the 1970s, and the human cost of a nation in transition. This is the first of a new series.

Author of SOUTH CALIFORNIA PURPLES, Baron R. Birtcher, recently spent some time discussing his latest novel with The Big Thrill:
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A Twisted Vengeance by Candace Robb

1399. York is preparing for civil war, teeming with knights and their armed retainers summoned for the city’s defense. Henry of Lancaster is rumored to have landed on the northeast coast of England, not so far from York, intent on reclaiming his inheritance—an inheritance which his cousin, King Richard, has declared forfeit.

With the city unsettled and rife with rumors, Eleanor Clifford’s abrupt return to York upon the mysterious death of her husband in Strasbourg is met with suspicion in the city. Her daughter Kate is determined to keep her distance, but it will not be easy—Eleanor has settled next door with the intention of establishing a house of beguines, or poor sisters. When one of the beguines is set upon in the night by an intruder, Kate knows that for the sake of her own reputation and the safety of her young wards she must investigate.

Author Candace Robb spent some time discussing A TWISTED VENGEANCE with The Big Thrill:
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I Wish You Missed Me by Bonnie Hearn Hill

Crime blogger Kit Doyle left her radio job to find missing people—but she didn’t realize she’d be searching for her best friend.

Farley Black, Kit’s friend and former radio co-host, is missing. He was supposed to be surfing but he never arrived at his Malibu Beach destination. As the last person to hear from him, Kit is determined to find out what’s happened.

But when Kit searches Farley’s home, a surprising discovery makes it clear that Farley has been lying to her—and everyone else. As she heads north in search of the truth, a series of menacing incidents convinces Kit that she’s being watched. Someone is tracking her every move. As her unknown pursuer grows bolder and more reckless, Kit realizes she isn’t just looking for her friend—but running from a killer.

Author Bonnie Hearn Hill took some time out of her busy schedule to discuss her latest book, I WISH YOU MISSED ME, with The Big Thrill:
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The Devil’s Country by Harry Hunsicker

Former Texas Ranger Arlo Baines didn’t come to the tiny West Texas town of Piedra Springs to cause trouble. After his wife and children were murdered, Arlo just wants to be left alone. Moving from place to place seems to be the only thing that eases the pain of his family’s violent end.

But a chance encounter outside a bar forces him to rescue a terrified woman and her children from mysterious attackers. When the woman turns up murdered the next day—her children missing—Arlo becomes the primary suspect in exactly the same type of crime he is trying desperately to forget.

Haunted by the fate of his family, and with the police questioning the existence of the dead woman’s children, Arlo decides it’s his duty to find them. The question is, just how deep will he have to sink into the dusty secrets of Piedra Springs to save them and clear his name?

The Big Thrill caught up with author Harry Hunsicker to discuss his latest novel, THE DEVIL’S COUNTRY:
more »

 
 

Hunting Savage by Dave Edlund

A freelance hacker uncovers top secret files about a government cover-up surrounding the 1967 Six-Day War and triggers a murderous rampage at a resort town in Central Oregon. When the files inadvertently land in the possession of Peter Savage, he is targeted by assassins from both sides of the Atlantic and implicated in murders he didn’t commit. As the body count rises and with nowhere to turn, Savage makes a desperate decision: he draws his pursuers to the Cascade Mountains, where he plans to leverage the harsh terrain to his advantage. Doggedly trailed by both law enforcement and a small army of battle-hardened assassins, Savage becomes both hunter and prey. With his own fate uncertain, Peter Savage fights overwhelming odds to reveal the truth before full-scale war engulfs the Middle East.

The Big Thrill recently interviewed author Dave Edlund about his latest thriller, HUNTING SAVAGE:

What do you hope readers will take away from this book?

First and foremost, hours of riveting entertainment. Second, I hope certain plot elements provoke an interest to carefully, and perhaps more fully, examine the political theatre leading up to major elections. And third, to raise awareness of the tragic loss of life during the USS Liberty incident in 1967.
more »

 
 

Reunited With the P.I. by Anna J. Stewart

Exactly why should P.I. Vince Sutton take his ex-wife’s case? Because she, assistant district attorney Simone Armstrong, put his brother in jail? Because the ambitious spitfire still drives him crazy? No, he’ll take it because “The Avenging Angel” makes him a deal he can’t refuse. Sparks fly when Vince works all-too-closely with Simone to locate her missing key witness…but in the process, they are drawn into a cold case. As much as he tries, Vince can’t deny that he’s never gotten over beautiful Simone, but can he admit his feelings to her—and himself? And can he save her from the danger that’s heading their way?

Bestselling author, Anna J. Stewart, discussed her latest novel, REUNITED WITH THE P.I., with The Big Thrill:

Was there anything new you discovered, or surprised you, as you wrote this book?

Simone and Vince have had vastly differing experiences with the justice system. Where Simone dedicated her life to it, believes in it, lives her life by it, Vince doesn’t have nearly as much faith. Figuring out a way for the two of them to work together to solve this disappearance while respecting the other’s opinions opened up an interesting level of communication between them. It also changed both of their minds to a certain respect, which I think is always a good result.
more »

 
 

Fatal Mistake by Susan Sleeman

An FBI agent must protect the woman who can identify a terrorist bomber in bestselling author Susan Sleeman’s riveting new romantic suspense novel, FATAL MISTAKE.

Each day could be her last…but not if he can help it.

Tara Parrish is the only person ever to survive an attack by the Lone Wolf Bomber. Scared and emotionally scarred by her near death, she goes into hiding with only one plan—to stay alive for another day. She knows he’s coming after her, and if he finds her, he will finish what he started.

Agent Cal Riggins has had only one goal for the past six months—to save lives by ending the Lone Wolf’s bombing spree. To succeed, he needs the help of Tara Parrish, the one person who can lead them to the bomber. Cal puts his all into finding Tara, but once he locates her, he realizes if he can find her, the Lone Wolf can, too. He must protect Tara at all costs, and they’ll both need to resist the mutual attraction growing between them to focus on hunting down the bomber, because one wrong move could be fatal.

Susan Sleeman recently spent some time with The Big Thrill discussing her latest novel, FATAL MISTAKE:
more »

 
 
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